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Effective and efficient delivery of our services = Te whakahaere tika i ā mātou ratonga

This section reports on how the Ministry continuously improved its service delivery and provided value for money. The efficient and effective delivery of the Ministry’s services contributes to the Government’s policy objective of lifting the performance of the public sector.

Managing in a changeable operating environment

The Ministry’s ability to identify and manage risks affects our ability to achieve our goals. We mitigate risks effectively through having strong governance structures for all our activities and through having an effective risk management policy, including business continuity plans.

The Ministry’s Leadership Team meets weekly to discuss progress on major projects. We regularly assess our organisational performance, our financial position and our compliance with statutory and internal policy requirements, and refine our management strategies in response.

To meet the challenge across our business we are reviewing and updating our operating model.

We are refining our portfolio management approach so that our agreed priorities become the primary unit of analysis and engagement. We want to be able to:

· understand opportunity costs

· make trade-offs transparently

· balance short term and long term investments

· take a ‘managed risk’ approach so that we can encourage innovation

· make recommendations on disinvesting in low return investments

We know that the sector needs a strong evidential base to support our future strategy and operating model and we are making more resources available for research and evaluation. 

Te Arataki

Te Arataki, the Ministry’s strategy to support Māori culture is a connecting vision with overlapping benefits for sector priorities. It is governed by the Ministry Leadership Team and aligns with the overarching strategic intentions of the Ministry.

Te Arataki was enabled through a strengthened commitment to four aspirational goals:

The Ministry is a leader in the protection and depiction of Māori culture:

· Strategic partnerships with the Ministry of Justice and Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori were established to support the delivery of oral history and digital content production for the Treaty Settlement Histories project.

· Community contributions to the 28 Māori Battalion website increased. Ministry of Education funding enabled the Ngārimu Scholarship Foundation to partner with the Manatū Taonga to facilitate a compilation of the oral histories of A, B and D companies.

· Taonga tūturu cases continue to be progressed to facilitate resolution of kaitiakitanga issues and to discharge of Manatū Taonga responsibilities under the Protected Objects Act.

· The Ministry supported the 150th commemorations of the NZ Wars in Waikato-Tainui and Tauranga Moana.

Māori arts, culture and heritage are well supported by the agencies funded through Vote Arts, Culture and Heritage:

· With Te Matatini, we commissioned a scoping report to inform our understanding of the contribution that kapa haka makes to Aotearoa New Zealand. As a result of the scoping report, a research programme is being developed to further inform our understanding and support strategic intentions to position kapa haka for sustained excellence.

· The Kaihautū network has commissioned a discussion paper on the contribution of Māori culture to a Better Public Service. The network continues to inform and add value to Crown and iwi-Māori engagement. The network lead ministries and agencies include Manatū Taonga, Pouhere Taonga, Te Papa, Te Matatini, Toi Māori, the National Library, Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua, Te Puni Kōkiri, Te Māngai Pāho and Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori.   


Te reo ‘hums’ in the Ministry – our intention is to actively use te reo Māori on appropriate occasions:

· A Māori Language, Culture and Values assessment survey of Ministry staff was completed in July 2013. 90% of participants believed that an understanding of Māori language and culture is relevant to their role.

· The Ministry continues to improve confidence levels through the use of te reo and waiata.

· The Ministry provided advice to government on the Māori Language Revitalisation policy.


The Ministry is recognised as a lead adviser to government on Māori arts, culture and heritage.

· The Manatū Taonga - Te Puni Kōkiri relationship agreement was refreshed and priorities were agreed for the next three years, with an annual work plan in progress.

· We negotiated 14 protocols and signed four protocols on 1 July. The total number of signed protocols is currently 31, with 10 negotiated but not signed and 19 under negotiation.

· With a total of 60 protocols scheduled to be signed as part of the current historical Treaty settlement negotiations, there remain significant challenges and opportunities for intervention with appropriate resourcing.

· We continued engagement with the Rongowhakaata Settlement Trust and Te Papa regarding the repatriation of Te Hau ki Turanga. 

The Ministry delivers support services efficiently

The Ministry is required to meet efficiency savings targets across the Ministry’s departmental appropriations. The 2013 Benchmarking Administrative and Support Services (BASS) benchmarked results confirm that the Ministry’s support functions are efficient and also effective for an organisation of this size.

The Ministry is already working with agencies to identify opportunities for future efficiency savings, using tools such as BASS, and we are investigating the possibility of shared IT services with other agencies in the sector by July 2015.

Our people

The Ministry has a capable workforce which is committed to advancing the cultural sector.  We are characterised by a “can do”, innovative, agile and collaborative culture and an ability to get things done.

We periodically survey staff engagement and identify actions to improve engagement levels. The current focus is on developing a better sense of common purpose and reviewing our approach to performance management.  Throughout the year the Ministry developed a workforce strategy to support our strategic direction and changing operating model. The workforce strategy will guide a series of action plans to be implemented in 2014/15.

The Ministry is committed to the principle and practice of equal employment opportunities in the recruitment, employment, training and promotion of staff, and to the identification and elimination of barriers that cause or perpetuate inequality in employment opportunities.

The Ministry is made up of a diverse range of staff including:

• 11% Maori

• 4% Asian descent

• 1% Pacific descent

• 63% Women

Capability and engagement measures

The following measures were used to monitor trends in the Ministry’s organisational capability and health:

What we want to do

Indicator

Performance

Sustain high levels of engagement for a responsive, productive and focussed workforce

Employee engagement is at best practice levels based on engagement survey results (JRA) – ratio of at least 30% engaged to 10% disengaged

2011: 29% engaged to 9% disengaged

2013: 20% engaged to 14% disengaged

The next engagement survey is scheduled for 2014/15.

 

At least 90% of new permanent staff still in the same role after 12 months

2011: 95.7%

2012: 96.8%

2013: 92%

2014: 80%

Average length of service for permanent staff is within a range of 4-6 years

 

Unplanned staff turnover is within a range of 10-15%

 

 

Māori recruitment and retention plan included in the Ministry workforce strategy

 

Staff understanding of Māori language and culture

2011: 5.6 years

2012: 6.0 years

2013: 4.96 years

2014: 5.6 years
 

2012: 9%

2013: 15.9%

2014: 7.38%

 

2013: The Ministry’s workforce strategy was drafted

2014: Māori recruitment and retention plan has been developed and included in the Ministry’s workforce strategy

 

2014: A Māori Language, Culture and Values assessment survey of Ministry staff was completed in July 2013. 90% of participants believed that an understanding of Māori language and culture is relevant to their role.

Improve the quality of policy advice and content we produce

Improvement in rating of quality of policy advice by independent assessment

2011: Average rating from NZIER 6.9 out of 10

2012: Average rating from NZIER 7.0 out of 10

2013: Average rating from NZIER 7.2 out of 10

2014: Average rating from NZIER 7.0 out of 10

What we want to do

Indicator

Performance

Improve efficiency, reliability and staff use of information systems

Percentage of time systems are available in normal business hours

2011: 99.4%

2012: 98.7%

2013: 99.9%

2014: 99.9%

This result assumes that there are 2,091 supported hours in a year. The percentage of time the network is functioning has remained reasonably static over the past four years.

System issues are resolved within an average of 2.5 hours

2011: Average 1.21 hours

2012: Average 2.42 hours

2013: Average 1.1 hours

2014: Average 2.5 hours

The average time taken to resolve outages increased in 2014. This was due to one system-wide outage that took two hours to resolve

Improving staff satisfaction with information systems

2012: 83% of respondents were satisfied that the technology they use at work meets their business needs. 83% of respondents were satisfied with the quality of service provided by the ICT service desk.

 

2013: 67% of respondents were satisfied that the technology they use at work meets their business needs. 91% of respondents were satisfied with the quality of service provided by the ICT service desk.

 

2014: 90% of respondents were satisfied that the technology they use at work meets their business needs. 88% of respondents were satisfied with the quality of service provided by the ICT service desk.


Updated on 23rd July 2015