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Daily Last Post to sound until 2018

The first daily public Last Post ceremony will be held at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park this Anzac Day 25 April and will be conducted every evening until 11 November 2018.

Image of the Last Post bugle call is courtesy of the New Zealand Defence Force.

The Last Post was used in wartime to signal the close of a day of battle. The sound of the Last Post notified those who were still out fighting or wounded to follow the sound of the call to find safety and rest.

Chief of Defence Force Lieutenant General (LTGEN) Tim Keating says that with the opening of Pukeahu the NZDF will mark the centenary of each of the remaining days of the First World War. Sounding the Last Post symbolically calls the spirits of the fallen that day 100 years ago home to our national cenotaph.

“We welcome public attendance and participation in the daily ceremonies. We will provide opportunities for non-New Zealand Defence Force buglers and individuals or groups from the community or from schools to recite The Ode”, said LTGEN Keating.

The Last Post ceremony will take the form of The Ode recited in Te Reo and English, the playing of Last Post, the observation of a minute’s silence and then the playing of Reveille. This ceremony may be enhanced on significant commemorative days and people are encouraged to lay personal or community floral tributes. The ceremony will be conducted daily between 5pm and 6pm beside the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior.

The Last Post is used by Commonwealth countries in Anzac Day and Remembrance Day ceremonies and other military commemorations. It is also played at military funerals to symbolise the ‘end of the soldier’s day’ meaning the military personnel can rest in peace.

More information on opportunities for public participation will be provided closer to Anzac Day.

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More details about the ceremony are available in the following 30 April 2015 article:

The Last Post to be played until end of WWI centenary.


Updated on 23rd July 2015