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How we performed against our impacts - Tā mātou whakatutukitanga ki ā mātou papātanga

The following outlines the Ministry's performance against our desired impacts, showing the more direct results of our activities which will contribute to each of our four outcomes. The Ministry has also identified key indicators which will tell us whether our desired impacts have been achieved. The Ministry’s outputs and supporting activities both directly and indirectly contribute to our outcomes. A number of these also contribute across the arts, heritage, media and sport (cultural) sectors as the Ministry’s activities are designed to encourage creation of, preservation of, engagement in, and excellence in, cultural activities.

This section also identifies the outputs that relate to each of the impacts. The Ministry’s performance against our output measures is reported in the Statement of Service Performance on pages 23 to 44.

In a year of fiscal constraint, the cultural sector faced the challenge of continuing to deliver within existing resourcing levels. For the Ministry, one way of helping organisations meet this challenge was to focus on efficiency, value for money and the potential for better collaboration.

Impact: Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

  • Histories and taonga are preserved for the future.
  • Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed.
  • Developing policy to incentivise structural upgrading of heritage buildings as part of the review of the earthquake-prone building provisions of the Building Act 2004 (led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment).
  • Scoping a possible review of the Protected Objects Act 1975.
  • Collecting and preserving stories of cultural importance to New Zealand.
  • Administering the annual New Zealand Oral History Awards.
  • Maintaining war graves in New Zealand and abroad, and upgrading the National War Memorial.
  • Completing Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
  • Administering legislation to protect symbols of nationhood and movable and found heritage.

 

  • Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media.
  • Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories.
  • Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage.
  • Maintain war graves and access to memorials and other places of national significance.
  • Delivery of the First World War centenary operating legacy projects.

Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

The Ministry continues to increase the number of histories it records. The Ministry produced a book based on oral history interviews recorded for the “Remembering Christchurch Oral History Project” which will be published in September 2015. We have progressed three other oral history projects – the “Treaty Settlement Stories Project” and commissioned projects for the Ministry for Primary Industries and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

The Ministry will also continue to encourage the community to contribute images, stories, and comments to our websites, including QuakeStories, 28th Māori Battalion, NZHistory, VietnamWar and Te Ara.

Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

Developing policy to support strengthening of earthquake-prone heritage buildings

As part of the review of the earthquake-prone building provisions of the Building Act 2004 (led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment), the Ministry has worked to develop policy options and advice required to support the strengthening of earthquake-prone heritage buildings.

Websites

The Ministry produces a range of websites bringing New Zealand’s culture and heritage online. These have proven to be an effective channel of communication to increase people’s understanding of New Zealand’s heritage and culture. Over the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of visits to the Ministry’s websites. Total visits have increased from 3.7 million in 2008/09 to 11.2 million in 2013/14, representing an increase of nearly 203 percent. Total visits are projected to be similar in 2015/16 due to the high interest in First World War material.

National War Memorial

New Zealand’s National War Memorial is located at Buckle Street in Wellington. The Memorial commemorates all New Zealanders who gave their lives in the South African War, the two World Wars, the conflicts in Malaysia and Vietnam, and on peace-keeping operations worldwide. The National War Memorial features a Carillon, a Hall of Memories, and the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior.

The primary goal of the Memorial is to help visitors remember and understand the New Zealand experience of war and its enduring impact on New Zealand society. The Memorial was largely closed from 2013 to 2015 for seismic strengthening and refurbishment. It re-opened in April 2015 and experienced a large increase in visitors as people visited the new Pukeahu National War Memorial Park.

Public talks

The Ministry arranged nine public talks during 2014/15 on subjects ranging from war history and the economy, to Māori and the Pacific. Average attendance was around 50 to 60 people (2013/14: 50-60 people). The Ministry plans to hold the same number of talks in 2015/16, subject to suitable space being available.

Impact: People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

  • Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases.
  • New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel informed about their country, history and culture.

 

 

  • Providing historical and cultural information that engages New Zealanders and international audiences.
  • Producing and promoting significant cultural and historical resources and events, including First World War centenary commemorative digital and print projects.
  • Raising public awareness and understanding of the First World War Centenary programme, through key commemorative events in August 2014 (to mark New Zealand’s entry into the war) and Anzac Day 2015 that were well attended by thousands of New Zealanders.
  • Progressing New Zealand’s First World War centenary commemorations projects, including completing Pukeahu National War Memorial Park.
  • Coordinating government involvement in the 175th commemorations of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.
  • Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of cultural sector services and activities, including visual, performing and literary arts, historic heritage, museum collections, taonga and whare taonga, cultural tourism, broadcasting and media standards.
  • Leading development of a framework to support cross-government initiatives that promote inclusive New Zealand identity.

 

  • Promotion of cultural events and significant commemorations.
  • Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories.
  • Produce and promote cultural and historical resources.
  • Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media.
  • Delivery of the First World War centenary operating legacy projects.

Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

A nationwide online survey of New Zealanders’ attitudes and beliefs about the First World War was conducted in November/December 2012.  A total of 4,017 responses were received from New Zealanders aged 15 years and over.  The sample was representative of the New Zealand population aged over 15 by region, age, gender, and ethnicity.  The survey measured respondents’ understanding of the First World War, and their attitudes and preferences for commemorating the centenary of the First World War. 

The survey results indicated that, on a self-report basis:

  • 2.4% of respondents had never heard of the First World War.
  • 15.7% of respondents had no real knowledge of the First World War.
  • 48.9% of respondents had a basic understanding of the First World War.
  • 24.9% of respondents had a reasonable understanding of the First World War.
  • 6.9% of respondents had a reasonably advanced understanding of the First World War.
  • 1.2% of respondents had an expert knowledge of the First World War, including its causes, the reason for New Zealand’s involvement, and the campaigns and major battles fought by New Zealanders.

This survey establishes a baseline understanding from which to measure the impact of the First World War Centenary Programme.  A follow-up survey will be conducted at the completion of the centenary period (2019).  The Programme aims to increase the percentage of respondents who indicate that they have a reasonable, or reasonably advanced, level of understanding about the First World War at the end of the centenary period.  A similar approach has been taken in both Australia and the United Kingdom.

First World War centenary projects

An important piece of work for the Ministry during 2014/15 was to provide strategic leadership of New Zealand’s commemorations of the First World War Centenary (WW100). ‘WW100' is a shared identity for New Zealand First World War centenary projects and activities, from official state ceremonies and legacy projects to community initiatives and personal projects. The WW100 Programme office is a partnership between this Ministry, New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF), the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFAT) and Trade, and the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA).

The objectives for the WW100 programme are to:

  • commemorate New Zealanders’ service and sacrifice in the First World War
  • explore how New Zealanders’ war experiences helped to shape our distinct and evolving national identity and aspirations
  • highlight New Zealand’s enduring commitment to peace, global security and international cooperation
  • strengthen New Zealand’s bilateral relationships with Australia and all other participants in the First World War
  • deepen understanding of the First World War by telling and preserving stories about New Zealanders’ war experiences at home and abroad
  • provide a living legacy of the war’s impacts and on-going significance, so current and future generations are more informed.

The WW100 programme enables a strategic approach to commemorating the war and means that the very larger amount of activity that is happening outside central government is occurring within a coherent and supported framework. A key focus for the programme this year was the commemoration of the outbreak of war in August 2014, and the centenary of the Gallipoli landings on Anzac Day 2015.

Anzac Day 2015

Tens of thousands of New Zealanders turned out to commemorate Anzac Day this year, throughout New Zealand. The WW100 Programme office supported local councils and groups planning commemorative events by providing materials, media releases, images and historical information to plan their commemorative events.

At a national level, the first ever national dawn service at the newly opened Pukeahu National War Memorial Park was attended by over 40,000 people, who gathered to mark the Gallipoli centenary. This unique event was developed by a multi-agency partnership, which included the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Visits and Ceremonial Office, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the New Zealand Defence Force, as well as Wellington City Council and the Wellington Tenths Trust. For the first time ever, the Governor-General of Australia, HE Sir Peter Cosgrove participated in New Zealand’s Anzac commemorations, laying a wreath alongside our own Governor-General at this dawn service. New Zealand’s Governor-General also joined HE Sir Peter Cosgrove at the sunset Last Post ceremony in Canberra. The dawn service, and the nationwide coverage it received, enabled the Ministry to position key messages about New Zealand’s diverse culture and First World War heritage.

After the dawn service, the formal national service was held at Pukeahu at 11am; this was attended by approximately 3,000 people, in addition to over 70 international representatives. The same multi-agency partnership was involved in developing this service. Anzac Day national events concluded with a Beat-the-Retreat ceremony at Pukeahu in the early evening.

Walking with an Anzac

‘Walking with an Anzac’ is a WW100 educational resource, which includes school visits, online resources and a Tumblr site for schools to share their ideas. ‘Walking with an Anzac’ featured on front page of Apple’s ITunesU, under the Gallipoli resource collection, in the lead up to Anzac Day. The resource proved very popular and was the top download for both the individual lessons and the full collection in April.

Online Cenotaph

The Ministry contributed to the development of Auckland War Memorial Museum's enhanced Online Cenotaph website. This provides a digital space where individuals and families can research the military records of those who served during the First World War. The WW100 website has promoted use of this during the period of the Gallipoli campaign by publishing a daily roll of honour to those who died at Gallipoli on that day, with direct links to the individual’s entry on the Cenotaph database.

First World War Centenary Print History

The Ministry’s First World War research and publishing programme has continued to grow. The Ministry is partnering with Massey University, the New Zealand Defence Force and the RNZRSA to produce 12 to 13 print histories by 2018. The Ministry is responsible for six of these and three have been published to date:

  • New Zealand and the First World War, Damien Fenton with Caroline Lord, Gavin McLean and Tim Shoebridge. Published by Penguin, October 2013. This was reprinted in February 2014 after selling out its first 5000-copy print run.  
  • The White Ships: New Zealand’s First World War Hospital Ships, Gavin McLean. Published by NZ Ship & Marine Society, October 2013.
  • New Zealand’s First World War Heritage, Imelda Bargas and Tim Shoebridge. Published by Exisle Publishing, April 2015.

Three more are in progress:

  • The Western Front, Ian McGibbon. To be published September 2016.
  • Māori and the First World War, Monty Soutar. To be published April 2017.
  • New Zealand and the First World War at Sea, Gavin McLean. To be published 2017.

These further projects are not part of the Centenary History print programme but present First World War content:

  • Battlefield guides reissues – Ian McGibbon’s guides to battlefields and sites of the Western Front (2001) and Gallipoli (2004) have been updated and reissued by Penguin.
  • Gallipoli's Landscape of War and Memory – Ian McGibbon has contributed to this Australian book, to be published late 2015.
  • Penguin Book of New Zealand War Writing – Ministry historian Gavin McLean has co-edited this work with Professor Harry Ricketts. It is due out in October 2015.
  • The Sorrow and the Pride reissue – the Ministry is supporting Jock Phillips and Chris Maclean to produce an updated version of The Sorrow and the Pride, a book on war memorials (1990). This will be published in early 2016.

Other projects include:

  • Firstworldwar.govt.nz, sub-site of NZHistory.net.nz – this currently presents 53 First World War web features. New content continues to be added, with a particular current focus on the ‘home front’ experience. A series of features have been commissioned by NZ Post and State Services Commission on aspects of the public service at war.
  • ‘Great War Stories’ – the Ministry supported two series of short (3-minute) films, which screened as part of TV3 News in August 2014 and April 2015. It is likely that two more series will be made for screening in 2016 and 2017. The films are hosted on Firstworldwar.govt.nz
  • ‘The War News’ – the Ministry provided historical advice to this 5-part Gibson Group documentary series, which screened on Prime TV in 2014
  • ‘Facing the Front’ exhibition – the Ministry curated this exhibition of First World War-related portraits at the NZ Portrait Gallery in Wellington in mid-2014
  • First World War conferences – in August 2014 the Ministry supported the academic conference: Experience of a Lifetime at Massey University, Wellington. The proceedings will be published in 2016.

Lottery Grants

In July 2014 the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board allocated a further $5 million to support the community’s involvement in the First World War centenary programme. The WW100 Programme Office worked with the Lottery Grants Board and Department of Internal Affairs in assessing applications for funding against the WW100 programme’s objectives.

During 2014/15 38 applications were funded, totalling $5 million. The grants were awarded for a range of initiatives including the restoration of local war memorials, new musical and theatrical compositions, planned additions to the Great War Exhibition, and for research and production of key volumes of the Centenary History print programme.

In addition, the Lottery Grants Board provided Creative New Zealand with seed funding of $1.5 million to establish the First World War Centenary Co-Commissioning Fund. By June 2015 grants totalling $1,180,443 had been awarded; the fourth and final funding round closes in November 2015.

Pukeahu National War Memorial Park

Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and its impact on New Zealand will be enhanced by Pukeahu National War Memorial Park. A whakawātea organised in partnership with the Wellington Tenths Trust and Palmerston North Māori Reserve Trust was held for Pukeahu National War Memorial Park in March 2015 and the Park was formally opened on 18 April 2015.

The vision for Pukeahu is that it will be the national place for New Zealanders to remember and reflect on this country’s experience of war, military conflict and peacekeeping, and how that experience shapes our ideals and sense of national identity. Visitors to the Park will be engaged through onsite and online material.

The Australian Memorial was opened in April 2015. Plans for memorials from Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, France, Belgium and Canada are in progress, and we expect these memorials will be installed and dedicated over the next four years.

Total visitors to the Park and the National War Memorial are up from previous years (10-15,000 per annum), with thousands of visitors each week now; since Anzac Day upwards of 40,000 people have visited Pukeahu.

New Zealanders who access Ministry information and places the Ministry manages feel informed about their country, history and culture

In 2015, a survey of the Ministry’s website users was conducted to gain feedback about our websites and identify areas of development to be included in our programme of work. As part of this survey, we asked users how well informed they were about a variety of subjects. We also asked them how well informed they felt about New Zealand, its history, and its culture after using our websites, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, better informed, and extremely well informed. 

After viewing our websites, 76 percent (2014: 89.8 percent) of respondents felt at least ‘somewhat more’ informed about New Zealand, its history and its culture, with 50 percent (2014: 60.6 percent) of respondents feeling ‘much more’ informed. In the previous two surveys we asked whether respondents felt they were either ‘better’ or ‘extremely’ well informed.

While these trends are declining, this could reflect that the strong user base (who are more likely to respond to the survey) already feel well-informed. The Ministry will look at exploring this with user focus groups in 2015/16.

Impact: Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment
 

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

  • Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch.
  • Provideing advice on policy, funding and other opportunities to enhance the contribution of the cultural sector to the Government’s wider social and economic goals.
  • Supporting the recovery from the Canterbury earthquakes by contributing to a range of cultural initiatives in greater Christchurch.
  • Overseeing implementation of the Arts and Culture and the Heritage Buildings and Places Recovery Programmes for Greater Christchurch.
  • Convening the cultural sector Joint-Agency Group (JAG) in Christchurch to ensure there is regular information-sharing, consistent advice to key stakeholders, and alignment of funding streams around agreed priority projects.
  • Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media.
  • Delivery of international cultural diplomacy projects.

Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

Creative New Zealand published the results of two surveys measuring New Zealanders’ engagement with the arts in 2014. New Zealanders and the Arts is a three-yearly survey which measures the attendance, participation and attitudes towards the arts of New Zealanders and young New Zealanders (10-14 year olds), and the Audience Atlas New Zealand 2014 measures trends in audience engagement with arts and cultural activities by audience segment. 

The New Zealanders and the Arts survey found that the 2011 earthquakes continue to limit Christchurch residents’ attendance and participation in the arts. However, there has been a marked increase in both areas since 2011. In 2014, 68 percent said they are actively involved in the arts just as much as prior to the earthquakes, compared to 58 percent in 2011.  41 percent say they attend the arts just as much as prior to the earthquakes, compared to just 25 percent in 2011. 

The Audience Atlas New Zealand 2014 survey showed that Canterbury was one of the most culturally active areas in New Zealand, along with Waikato and Nelson, with 99% percent of people having attended a cultural event or location in the past three years.  This represents an 8 percent increase from 2011, when Canterbury had the second lowest attendance surveyed. 

In 2007/08[1] Sport New Zealand conducted its Active New Zealand Survey, which collects data on sport and recreation participation by New Zealand adults aged 16 years and over.

In 2007/08, 75 percent of adults in Greater Christchurch took part in at least one sport or recreation activity (excluding gardening) per week. Over a 12 month period, 79 percent of adults participated in at least two different types of sport and recreation activities, and, on average, adults participated in 4.4 different sport and recreation activities[2].

[1] 2007/08 data is used as our baseline for participation in sport and recreation in the Greater Christchurch region.

[2] This data has been updated for changes in measurement methodology and to allow for more accurate comparison with the latest survey results.

In 2014/15, Sport New Zealand conducted its latest Active New Zealand Survey. The comparable results are:

  • 83 percent of adults in Greater Christchurch took part in at least one sport or recreation activity (excluding gardening) per week (a 7.7 percentage point increase)
  • 82 percent participated in at least two different types of activities over a 12 month period (a 3.0 percentage point increase)
  • On average, over a 12 month period adults participated in 4.3 different activities (similar to the 2007/08 results)

As Sport New Zealand data was not available in the period preceding the earthquakes, it is not possible to assess the true impact of the earthquakes on participation in sport and recreation in Greater Christchurch.

Sport New Zealand conducted its baseline Young People’s Survey in 2011 asking young people about their participation in sport and active recreation.

For Greater Christchurch, results show that:

  • over 6 out of 10 (64 percent) young people in the region spent 3+ hours a week on informal sport and recreation
  • over 5 out of 10 (55 percent) young people in the region spent 3+ hours a week on organised sport and recreation.

The Young People’s Survey will be undertaken again in the next strategic plan period (2015-2020). The exact timing of the survey is yet to be determined.

Impact: New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

  • People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders.
  • Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed.
  • Producing digital and print publications which showcase Māori culture, history, and language, including the history of Māori in the First World War and the 28th Māori Battalion in the Second World War.
  • Negotiating Treaty settlement iwi protocols.
  • Advancing Treaty Settlement Stories oral history, print, and digital projects.
  • Co-ordinating wānanga, to assure the quality of content across the Ministry’s cultural publications.
  • Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of Māori culture and heritage.
  • Providing guidance to Māori on cultural planning to support achievement of Māori cultural aspirations post-settlement.
  • Encouraging the use of and access to te reo in the work and workplaces of agencies funded through the Ministry.
  • Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media.
  • Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories.
  • Produce and promote cultural and historical resources and events.
  • Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage.

People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the Treaty Settlement process for the management and protection of Māori culture and heritage

From July 2014 to 30 June 2015, the Ministry negotiated and agreed 20 relationship agreement protocols with individual iwi. Overall the Ministry has signed 38 protocols.    

The Ministry has developed its Treaty Settlement Stories project and will be producing oral histories of the Treaty settlement process, as well as other Treaty settlement digital projects.

The Ministry already has some information on Treaty settlements on existing websites and our website survey asks respondents how well this content informs them about the Treaty settlement process, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, well informed, and extremely well informed.

The responses received in June 2015 show that 39 percent (2014: 37.6 percent) of respondents consider that they are well informed or extremely well informed, and 68 percent (2014: 82.8 percent) considered the content made them at least somewhat informed 15% said they had no opinion.

Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed

The Ministry is responsible for managing taonga under the Protected Objects Act 1975, which regulates the export of protected New Zealand objects, the illegal export and import of protected New Zealand and foreign objects, and the sale, trade and ownership of taonga tūturu, including what to do if you find a taonga or Māori artefact.

Our work in this area ensures significant movable heritage subject to the Protected Objects Act is not lost overseas.

In 2015, the Ministry conducted a survey asking respondents whether they considered that taonga Māori are being properly cared for in New Zealand, using a scale of yes, no, or no opinion.

In June 2015, 26 percent of respondents said ‘yes’ they felt taonga were being properly cared for in New Zealand. 31 percent said ‘no’ and 42 percent responded with ‘no opinion’.

Impact: A collaborative cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

  • Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations.
  • Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes.
  • Developing a strategy to frame and drive the Government’s investments in New Zealand’s culture.
  • Providing advice on policy, legislation, and funding to enhance sector coherence and infrastructure.
  • Supporting the Heritage Forum to identify and manage priority work across the heritage sector.
  • Improving funded agencies’ strategic planning and performance reporting frameworks through collaboration and support.
  • Advising on mechanisms for sustaining the performance and financial strength of key cultural sector agencies, through agency cooperation and development of shared service arrangements, and assisting the cultural sector to diversify revenues.
  • Undertaking reviews and making improvements in cultural areas, including the Protected Objects Act 1975 review, commemorations review and use of creative commons.
  • Working with key agencies to increase levels of private and philanthropic giving in the wider cultural sector.
  • Advising on the appointment of Board members for Crown-connected agencies.
  • Advising on and administering legislation for the cultural Crown entities.
  • Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media.
  • Performance monitoring and development of arts, heritage, media and sport Vote-funded agencies.
  • Advice on and processing of arts, heritage, media and sport board appointments.
  • Negotiated services to support Ministers including speeches and correspondence.

Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

The Ministry published the results of its second Giving and Sponsorship survey of the cultural sector in December 2014. 

Over 800 cultural organisations responded.  Key findings include the following:

  • Overall 83 percent of total funding support came from central and local government and the Lottery Grants Board and 17 percent from private sector sponsorship and philanthropy.
  • Organisations were nearly twice as likely to seek support from individuals, couples and families (60 percent), and trusts and foundations (59 percent) than from corporations (32 percent).
  • Less than 20 percent of organisations had at least one employee whose primary responsibility it is to fundraise and manage relationships with funders.
  • Nearly one third of organisations said that increasing or retaining staff who do this work would have the greatest positive impact on improving fundraising capability.
  • Only 52 percent of organisations have a list of current or potential supporters.

The report has been disseminated to cultural sector organisations to help inform their fundraising and sponsorship strategies.  The findings are also informing the Minstry’s ongoing work to encourage cultural philanthropy in New Zealand. 

Tapping into new streams of private sector support:

  • From 2012 to 2015 Creative New Zealand invested $1.1 million in Creative Giving, a three-year pilot fundraising capability building initiative.  Of this $700,000 was provided in matched funding to arts or cultural organisations which had successfully raised private funds.  The ASB Community Trust also partnered with Creative Giving and offered $200,000 towards organisational infrastructure for fundraising.
  • The Arts Foundation launched its crowd funding website Boosted in April 2013. In the two years to April 2015 it has raised over $1 million through the support of 6000+ donors who have donated to 170 arts projects.

Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

The Government’s ongoing commitment to better public services necessitates greater collaboration across the cultural sector and between funded agencies in particular.  The Ministry has worked with funded agencies over the past year to identify further opportunities for collaboration and continues its commitment to enhancing the performance of the public sector. In light of this and the constrained fiscal environment, the Ministry has worked with cultural sector organisations to improve coordination across the sector.

This year the Ministry has changed the way in which we measure collaboration. While previously we have counted the number of collaborative arrangements in place between agencies, this year we will be highlighting notable examples. This is a better representation of our increasing impact on a collaborative cultural sector. Counting our collaborative arrangements does not provide enough context, and the number of collaborative arrangements is expected to decrease as greater efficiencies are established and multiple arrangements are consolidated into one arrangement. This impact measure will be discontinued going into 2015/16.

Funded agencies collaborated in new and innovative ways during the year to save costs and/or improve effectiveness. Some notable examples include:

  • The Ministry and Creative New Zealand jointly developed a framework to monitor the outcomes of the New Zealand Professional Orchestra Review (completed in 2013) and reached agreement with the orchestras on the measures and targets they will report against once the Review is implemented.
  • NZ On Air and the Broadcasting Standards Authority commissioned Colmar Brunton in late 2014 to carry out a comprehensive face-to-face survey of more than 700 children aged six to14 and their parents about the media consumption of children. This research provided unique insights into children’s media consumption, audience behaviours and attitudes to content which directly benefits both organisations.
  • The Contemporary Popular Music Group, comprising NZ On Air, the New Zealand Music Commission, Creative New Zealand and Te Māngai Pāho, agreed to the first inter-agency music strategy during 2014/15.  This will help these agencies take a joined-up approach to supporting and promoting New Zealand popular music.
  • The New Zealand Film Commission and NZ On Air agreed to fund three feature-length documentaries as part of Screen New Zealand’s first funding initiative, called Doc Connect.  The New Zealand Film Commission, NZ On Air and Film New Zealand established the virtual agency Screen New Zealand in 2013 to work together in the interests of the screen sector.

The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra contributed to the soundscape for the exhibition ‘Gallipoli: The Scale of Our War’ which was developed by Te Papa, working closely with Weta Workshop, and opened at Te Papa in April 2015.  Nga

  • Taonga Sound and Vision also supported Te Papa’s Gallipoli exhibition (and other First World War exhibitions) by providing moving image and sound material from its collections.
  • Ngā Taonga is assisting Te Papa with the safe storage of its nitrate collection of photographic negatives at Ngā Taonga’s Whitireia storage facility.
  • During 2014, the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra recorded eleven works for broadcast by ten New Zealand composers.  This is a long-running initiative with SOUNZ (the Centre for New Zealand Music) in association with Radio New Zealand.
  • In late 2014, Ngā Taonga’s travelling film show partnered with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga to present Te Waipounamu Marae Film Tour - Ōtautahi ki Awarua.  The programme comprised over 20 films celebrating Ngāi Tahu history, and screened in seven local marae across the South Island. The films, made between 1910 and 2008, featured Ngāi Tahu people, land and traditions.
  • Auckland-based office staff of the Royal New Zealand Ballet joined the Creative New Zealand Auckland office to save costs and provide access to better facilities and communal spaces.

Heritage Forum

The Government has indicated a need for closer integration between public agencies and a more coherent approach to policy development. In 2011/12, the Ministry established the Heritage Forum to forge stronger links and more coherence between government heritage agencies and across the sector, and to be a visible presence promoting heritage interests at a national level.

In 2013/14 the Ministry reviewed the Forum’s operations and concluded that a different focus was needed.  In 2014/15 the Ministry started work on developing two Sector Reference Groups that could broaden sector engagement and deliver projects that would support the Forum’s strategic programme for future years.

Legislative change for the cultural sector

During 2014/15 the Ministry progressed a number of proposals for legislative change in the cultural sector. 

The Waitangi National Trust Board Amendment Bill was considered by the Māori Affairs Select Committee and progressed through its Second Reading. The Bill addresses a potential conflict between the constitutional and trusteeship roles of the Governor-General and Ministers as ex officio members of the Waitangi National Trust Board. The Bill also provides for the Trust Deed and the Waitangi National Trust Board Act 1932 to provide fixed terms of appointment for Board members. 

The Radio New Zealand Amendment Bill also completed its Second Reading.  The key purpose of this Bill is to provide for a new Radio New Zealand Charter, which results from a Parliamentary review required by the Act.

The Ministry provided advice to the Local Government and Environment Select Committee on the Arts Centre of Christchurch Trust Bill, which was enacted on 5 June 2015.  The Arts Centre of Christchurch Trust Act 2015 provides the legal foundations for the Trust Board to continue to be able to respond to damage from the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, by updating and modernising the governance arrangements of the trust board and enshrining the various objects of the trust in legislation.  

The Ministry contributed to work on the New Zealand Flag Referendums Bill, for which the Ministry of Justice is the lead agency. The Bill includes implementation provisions that would amend the Flags, Emblems, and Names Protection Act 1981, if voters in the second referendum on the New Zealand flag vote in favour of changing the flag. The Bill was referred to the Justice and Electoral Committee in March 2015.


Updated on 3rd December 2015