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Project 5: Identifying and restoring sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu

Objectives

Increase awareness of Ngāi Tahu heritage.

Identify, record and acknowledge sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu.

Restore damaged significant sites where feasible.

Lead agencies

Ngāi Tahu

Key partners

MCH, Heritage New Zealand, CERA, CCC, SDC, WDC

Project outcome

New development within areas of significance acknowledges the cultural identity and values of the area.

Damaged sites are restored if possible, or marked and appropriately acknowledged if restoration is not possible.

Problem/Opportunity

Redevelopment of greater Christchurch presents the opportunity to recognise Ngāi Tahu heritage and values. This recognition may be achieved in new buildings, art and landscape design.

Redevelopment also presents an opportunity to identify further Ngāi Tahu heritage sites and provide guidance to owners and councils on appropriate recognition of these sites in consultation with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and local Ngāi Tahu Papatipu rūnanga.

Significant sites that have been damaged include Moncks Cave, Te Ana o Hineraki (Moa Bone Point Cave), Rapanui (Shag Rock) and the Kaiapoi Monument. Moncks Cave, Te Ana o Hineraki and Rapanui present opportunities for creative restoration, whether through art or historical interpretation. Earthquake damage to the Kaiapoi Monument presents opportunities for the conservation and seismic upgrade of this highly significant Ngāi Tahu heritage place.

What has happened

Ngāi Tahu has identified important sites in the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan. That Plan ‘presents Christchurch with the opportunity to both incorporate and showcase Ngāi Tahu cultural identity and values in a more visionary and integrated way’ (Christchurch Central Recovery Plan, page 39).

Ngāi Tahu has developed Whakaoratia Ōtautahi, a statement of Ngāi Tahu aspirations for the Christchurch recovery and rebuild.

Ngāi Tahu is a strategic partner in implementing the Natural Environment Recovery Programme for Greater Christchurch, Whakaara Taiao (October 2013) and the Land Use Recovery Plan, TeMahere Whakahaumanu Tāone (December 2013). Both of these documents address some matters relating to Ngāi Tahu heritage recovery that complement the projects in the Heritage Recovery Programme.

Ngāi Tahu is part of the Joint Management Board (JMB) considering applications for consents for all new builds within the Christchurch CBD. The JMB has regard to Ngāi Tahu cultural heritage values.  The JMB comprises representatives of CERA, CCC and Ngāi Tahu.

What will happen

Ngāi Tahu will:

  • research and identify sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu
  • provide advice to guide policy on the recognition of sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu and Ngāi Tahu values
  • carry out a stocktake of sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu to determine damage
  • lead the restoration of identified sites
  • participate in decision-making on new development on these sites
  • identify opportunities for the physical representation of Ngāi Tahu heritage.

Heritage New Zealand will:

  • provide existing information on sites.

CERA will:

  • provide support and advice to Ngāi Tahu as required
  • identify sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu on the CERA Community Asset Map.

In consultation with Ngāi Tahu, CCC, SDC and WDC will:

  • as part of their reviews of district plans – consider the identification of sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu and develop policy guidance on appropriate acknowledgement and protection.

Indicative timeframe

Ongoing


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Project 4: Ensuring that district plan regulation assists recovery

Objectives

Facilitate repair, reconstruction and seismic strengthening of heritage buildings through changes to district plans.

Lead agencies

CCC, SDC, WDC

Key partners

CERA, Heritage New Zealand

Project outcome

District plans facilitate repairs, reconstruction and seismic strengthening of heritage buildings through appropriate objectives, policies and rules.

Problem/Opportunity

The Christchurch Central Recovery Plan changed the heritage provisions of CCC’s District Plan as they relate to the central city. (See Appendix 1 to the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan: Amendments to Christchurch City Council’s District Plan.) The amended provisions take a more permissive approach to strengthening and altering earthquake-damaged heritage buildings to meet the requirements of the relevant building codes.

The provisions that apply to heritage buildings outside the central city have not been changed. This means that owners of heritage buildings located outside the central city are more likely to need resource consents, leading to delays and additional costs. The CCC can refund the costs of non-notified resource consents to owners who receive a Heritage Incentive Grant from the Council. In all other cases, owners meet the costs of processing resource consent applications (notified and non-notified). A CCC Hearings Panel or Commissioner makes decisions on most applications. Costs range from $1500 to $8500; half of the applications cost between $2000 and $3000.

There is an opportunity for CCC, SDC and WDC to review their district plans to facilitate heritage recovery. This may include reviewing their schedules of heritage buildings and places.

What has happened

As noted, the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan changed the heritage provisions of the CCC’s District Plan as they apply in the central city only. CCC is preparing background information to support a future district plan review (an alternative approach to a Recovery Plan that may achieve the same outcome).

What will happen

CCC, SDC and WDC will:

  • review the heritage provisions of their district plans to ensure they facilitate heritage recovery in accordance with the Recovery Strategy for Greater Christchurch.

CCC will:

  • monitor the number of applications and the efficiency and costs of processing applications for resource consents for work on heritage buildings.

CERA will:

  • assist CCC to consider the need for a Recovery Plan to alter its District Plan, if there is a need to do so.

Indicative timeframe

CCC, SDC and WDC timelines will apply

CCC District Plan review by 2016


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Project 3: Reusing heritage fabric retrieved from heritage and character buildings

Objectives

Ensure that the demolition and deconstruction of heritage buildings (including memorials, bridges and other heritage items) is carried out in a manner that enables reconstruction or the reuse of heritage fabric.

Lead agencies

Heritage New Zealand, CCC, SDC, WDC, CERA

Key partners

MCH, Ngāi Tahu

Project outcome

Built heritage fabric is reused for the repair of heritage buildings or, if this is not possible, in new developments and other heritage projects.

Problem/Opportunity

Though there have been some successes, in many instances owners have retained little or no fabric from demolished buildings. There is an ongoing need for agencies to provide expert advice and guidance to owners on the retrieval of heritage fabric that warrants retention.

There are opportunities to:

  • investigate retention of elements of buildings on site as part of rebuilding
  • interpret archaeological materials uncovered during demolition.

Storage of retrieved fabric is challenging because of the large amount of space required, limited capacity and the cost of providing more. A review of storage requirements is needed to ensure valued fabric is stored appropriately.

What is happening

Some property owners have deconstructed and recorded heritage buildings (for example, the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament) so that either they can be rebuilt or parts can be reused in new buildings.

Partner agencies have saved and stored some heritage features. CCC and Heritage New Zealand have produced guidelines for the reuse of heritage material (Heritage Recovery – Guideline 6 – for the Reuse of Heritage Material (PDF, 203Kb)).

Heritage New Zealand recommends the appropriate approach to demolition and deconstruction of heritage buildings in greater Christchurch in its advice on applications for resource consents. Its recommendations range from careful dismantling and marking of building components to taking photographic records before demolition. Relevant councils can accept or reject Heritage New Zealand’s recommendations.

Heritage New Zealand also provides advice on fabric retrieval when the Chief Executive of CERA commissions demolition works under section 38 of the CER Act, and this advice may be reflected in demolition contracts. In cases where it is both safe and economic to retrieve material, Heritage New Zealand and CCC also provide advice on fabric retrieval to willing building owners entering into demolition contracts.

In Christchurch City, CCC owns and stores retrieved material. CCC also maintains a database of the source of this material and its nature and composition. This is an important resource for recovery planning. CCC encourages former owners to request the return of material. In Waimakariri, WDC can impose a condition on resource consents requiring an owner to retrieve and store material for reuse. In Selwyn, SDC can consider imposing similar conditions.

What will happen

Heritage New Zealand, CCC, SDC and WDC will:

  • continue to encourage retrieval and storage of heritage fabric to enable its reuse in new development and other initiatives
  • work towards making the CCC database of heritage material accessible to owners of heritage buildings.

Heritage New Zealand, CCC, SDC and WDC will:

  • review storage facilities
  • identify an appropriate strategy for the ongoing storage of retrieved fabric.

Consistent with its operations and role, CERA will:

  • work with CCC, SDC, WDC and Heritage New Zealand to encourage owners of heritage buildings in which CERA has an interest to include the retention of heritage fabric in demolition contracts, where this is appropriate and feasible.

Indicative timeframe

Ongoing


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Project 2: Determining the best methods of strengthening heritage buildings

Objective

Ensure that methods to strengthen heritage buildings are consistent with best practice and respect heritage values.

Lead agencies

MCH, Heritage New Zealand, CCC

Key partners

SDC, WDC, CERA

Project outcome

Heritage buildings are strengthened while respecting and retaining their heritage values.

Problem/Opportunity

The government has reviewed policy for strengthening buildings, including heritage buildings. The partner agencies and building owners will need to consider the implications.

What has happened

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has consulted publicly on proposed changes to earthquake-prone buildings policy. The Minister for Building and Construction announced final policy decisions in August 2013. Two of the key government decisions are:

  • all earthquake-prone buildings will have to be strengthened, or demolished, within 20 years of new legislation taking effect (that is, assessment by territorial authorities within five years and strengthening within 15 years of assessment)
  • owners of earthquake-prone category 1 buildings (entered on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero under the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014) and those which will be on the National Historic Landmarks List, will be able to apply for extensions of up to ten years to the national timeframe for strengthening. (See press release.)

A Bill giving effect to these decisions, the Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill, was introduced in December 2013.

What will happen

MCH will:

  • contribute to the development of government policy and provide advice on government policy to partner agencies.

Heritage New Zealand, CCC, SDC and WDC will:

  • review the implications of the earthquake-prone buildings policy for heritage buildings and the retention of heritage fabric
  • identify appropriate policy, methods and guidance for strengthening heritage buildings consistent with approved standards.

Indicative timeframe

Implementation is ongoing


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Project 1: Retaining heritage buildings and places

Objective

Ensure that collaboration between partner agencies encourages and enables building owners to retain heritage buildings and places, where feasible.

Lead agencies

CERA, Heritage New Zealand, CCC, SDC, WDC

Key partners

Ngāi Tahu, MCH

Project outcome

Heritage buildings and places are retained and adapted to new uses, where appropriate, to ensure they have an ongoing function.

Problem/Opportunity

Greater Christchurch has lost much of the heritage that was one of its defining characteristics. Nonetheless, many heritage buildings and places remain. There are opportunities for partner agencies to work with property owners to help ensure that, where feasible:

  • owners of heritage buildings are supported and encouraged to explore retention options, including mothballing where appropriate
  • heritage buildings are not subject to ‘demolition by neglect’
  • damaged heritage buildings are assessed according to international best practice
  • owners of restorable heritage buildings can repair and make their buildings safe in the short term, and can restore or redevelop buildings for long-term use and protection
  • owners of restorable heritage buildings can strengthen their buildings to meet the requirements of the Building Act 2004.

Early collaboration between owners, their advisers and the partner agencies helps to achieve the project outcome.

Heritage New Zealand and CCC advise on options for retention under the process set out in the CERA Decision-making processes. The costs of strengthening and challenges in securing insurance mean some owners choose to demolish.

What has happened

The partner agencies are actively assisting building owners. Several agencies are providing financial assistance through contestable funding processes and MCH, Heritage New Zealand, CCC, WDC and SDC established the CEHB Fund to help repair earthquake-damaged heritage buildings.

The Christchurch Central Recovery Plan  changed the heritage provisions of the CCC’s District Plan in the central city to take a more permissive approach to strengthening and altering earthquake-damaged heritage buildings to meet building codes.

Some property owners are ensuring important heritage buildings are strengthened, restored and   refurbished. In addition, some owners have shored up façades with a view to restoring them. One notable example is the Manchester Street façade of the former Excelsior Hotel (which the Christchurch Heritage Trust purchased for restoration).

What will happen

CERA will:

  • maintain up-to-date data from its operations on the current and likely future status of heritage buildings and places
  • where possible and appropriate, provide Heritage New Zealand, CCC, SDC and WDC with sufficient and timely information on heritage buildings being considered for works under section 38 of the CER Act to enable full consideration of options for retention
  • maintain the process [LINK Decision-making process] for assessing works to heritage buildings undertaken under section 38 of the CER Act.

Heritage New Zealand will:

  • provide up-to-date data to CERA on the current and future status of heritage buildings and places entered on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero.
  • work with owners to explore alternatives to demolition (which may include providing owners with additional engineering advice on retaining and strengthening buildings)
  • advise CERA on the outcomes of investigations into building retention
  • advise CCC, SDC and WDC on the heritage values of buildings, and engineering advice where obtained
  • administer the National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund to assist building owners.

CCC will:

  • provide up-to-date data to CERA on the current and future status of listed heritage buildings and places
  • work with building owners to explore alternatives to demolition (which may include providing owners with additional engineering advice)
  • advise CERA on the outcomes of investigations into buildings and options for retention
  • administer the Council’s Heritage Incentive Fund
  • allocate Central City Landmark Heritage Grant funds
  • advise the CEHB Fund Trust on applications for grants from the CEHB Fund
  • provide administrative support to the CEHB Fund
  • process applications for resource consents for restoring heritage places and buildings.

SDC and WDC will:

  • provide up-to-date data to CERA on the current and future status of listed heritage buildings and places
  • work with owners to explore alternatives to demolition, including obtaining alternative engineering advice on retaining and strengthening buildings
  • process resource consents to restore heritage buildings and places.

SDC will also:

  • administer the Selwyn Heritage Fund to encourage the maintenance and enhancement of heritage buildings in the Selwyn District.

WDC will also:

  • administer its Landmarks Programme, which identifies and researches heritage resources within the district.

Indicative timeframe

Ongoing


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Heritage recovery projects – Ngā Kaupapa hōtaka haumanu

This section sets out the eight projects that comprise the Heritage Recovery Programme:

  1. retaining heritage buildings and places
  2. determining the best methods of strengthening heritage buildings
  3. reusing heritage fabric retrieved from heritage and character buildings
  4. ensuring that district plan regulation assists recovery
  5. identifying and restoring sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu
  6. retrieving archaeological information and artefacts
  7. conserving artefacts recovered from archaeological sites
  8. keeping memory and awareness alive

How do the projects achieve the Heritage Recovery Programme outcomes?

The following shows how the projects align with the Heritage Recovery Programme outcomes.

Outcome 1

Heritage buildings and places contribute to a strong sense of identity, a quality urban environment, tourism and economic growth, supporting the recovery of greater Christchurch.

  • Project 1: Retaining heritage buildings and places
  • Project 8: Keeping memory and awareness alive

Outcome 2

Heritage agencies assist property owners where a collaborative approach can help to ensure heritage buildings are made safe and restored

  • Project 1: Retaining heritage buildings and places
  • Project 2: Determining the best methods of strengthening heritage buildings

Outcome 3

Heritage buildings and places are adapted to new uses, where appropriate, to ensure they have an ongoing function

  • Project 1: Retaining heritage buildings and places
  • Project 2: Determining the best methods of strengthening heritage buildings
  • Project 4: Ensuring that district plan regulation assists recovery

Outcome 4

Existing heritage and character buildings and places are retained, and where practicable, conserved in a manner that involves the least amount of physical intervention

  • Project 1: Retaining heritage buildings and places

Outcome 5

Heritage recovery recognises and celebrates Ngāi Tahu’s heritage

  • Project 5: Identifying and restoring sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu

Outcome 6

Heritage recovery recognises and celebrates all cultural influences that have contributed to the heritage of greater Christchurch

  • Project 1: Retaining heritage buildings and places
  • Project 8: Keeping memory and awareness alive

Outcome 7

Heritage materials are retrieved safely to enable their reuse, and a sample of greater Christchurch’s archaeological heritage is recovered through excavation and retained

  • Project 3: Reusing heritage fabric retrieved from heritage and character buildings
  • Project 6: Retrieving archaeological information and artefacts
  • Project 7: Conserving artefacts recovered from archaeological sites

The key partners for each project will contribute to the projects where this is feasible and they can be of assistance. The project descriptions specify the particular actions that partner agencies have identified.

ICOMOS New Zealand Charter 2010

The ICOMOS New Zealand Charter provides useful guidance on best practice heritage conservation. ICOMOS (the International Council on Monuments and Sites) is an international non-governmental organisation of heritage professionals.

Abbreviations in the project descriptions

CCC: Christchurch City Council

CEHB Fund: Canterbury Earthquake Heritage Buildings Fund

CERA: Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority

MCH: Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Heritage New Zealand: Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga

SDC: Selwyn District Council

WDC: Waimakariri District Council


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Financial assistance for heritage buildings in greater Christchurch – potential sources

Funding for heritage buildings and places in private ownership

Heritage New Zealand’s National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund

The National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund can help fund work to stabilise, repair and restore privately owned Category 1 historic places (including buildings) as well as certain land and archaeological sites. Since the earthquakes, the National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund has given over $175,000 to greater Christchurch. For information on the National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund.

Telephone +64 3 357 9629, fax +64 3 358 9628
For earthquake-related enquiries, email: quakeenquiries@heritage.org.nz
For other enquiries, email: information@heritage.org.nz

CCC Heritage Incentive Grants Fund

The CCC’s Heritage Incentive Grants Fund provides financial assistance to owners of heritage items listed in the Christchurch City Plan and Banks Peninsula District Plan. Owners of listed heritage items can apply for grants of up to 50 percent of the costs of:

  • conservation of exterior and interior heritage fabric, including earthquake repairs
  • seismic strengthening, fire and access upgrades to meet Building Code requirements
  • professional fees of, for example, architects, engineers and quantity surveyors
  • reimbursement of non-notified Council resource consent fees.

CCC Central City Landmark Heritage Grant

In the 2012/13 financial year, CCC made major grants for landmark heritage restoration to the Christchurch Club ($1.7 million) and the former Trinity Congregational Church ($1 million). CCC’s Three Year Plan makes provision for a further $2 million per year for landmark heritage restoration in Christchurch between 2013/14 and 2015/16.

For advice on CCC’s Heritage Incentive Grants and Central City Landmark Heritage Grants, contact the team on: heritage@ccc.govt.nz. For more information see CCC’s Incentive Fund Grantsinformation.

Selwyn Heritage Fund

The Selwyn Heritage Fund is open to residents and ratepayers of the Selwyn District. Its purpose is to encourage and assist owners to maintain and enhance the district’s heritage buildings and protected trees.

Telephone: +64 3 3472974 or +64 3 318 8338
Email: heritagefund@selwyn.govt.nz

Funding for heritage buildings and places owned by not-for-profit groups

Lottery World War One Commemorations, Environment and Heritage makes grants to not-for-profit organisations to foster the conservation, preservation and promotion of New Zealand’s natural, physical and cultural heritage. See: http://www.communitymatters.govt.nz/Funding-and-grants---Lottery-grants---Lottery-Environment-and-Heritage#one

Incorporated societies or registered charitable trusts of community based organisations may also be eligible for Canterbury Community Trust donations.


Updated on 23rd July 2015

What processes are in place to make decisions?

When CERA proposes to carry out works under section 38 of the CER Act, including demolition, on earthquake-damaged heritage buildings, the following processes have been put in place to make decisions.

  1. CERA considers whether works to a heritage building should be carried out.
  2. CERA notifies Heritage New Zealand and the relevant council (CCC, SDC or WDC) when works are being considered on heritage buildings that are entered on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero (Category 1 or 2) or listed by CCC, Banks Peninsula, SDC or WDC.
  3. Heritage New Zealand and council heritage advisers review the owner’s engineer’s report, if available, and the heritage significance of the building.
  4. Heritage New Zealand and the relevant council may commission independent engineering advice, or provide in-house engineering comments.
  5. Where possible, CERA provides a peer review of the owner’s engineer’s report.
  6. Heritage New Zealand and the relevant council may work with CERA to pursue alternatives to demolition if the owner is willing and safety issues can be addressed.
  7. The Chief Executive of CERA or their delegate makes the final decision on the proposed works.

The above decision-making process is not binding on CERA and its Chief Executive but will be followed where possible.


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Where can I get free expert advice on my heritage property?

Greater Christchurch

Across greater Christchurch, Heritage New Zealand provides:

  • advice on conserving, making safe and repairing heritage buildings and places
  • advice on the archaeological authority (consent) process
  • information on the National Heritage Preservation Incentive Fund
  • information on the Canterbury Earthquake Heritage Buildings Fund.Telephone +64 3 357 9629, fax +64 3 358 9628

For earthquake-related enquiries, email: quakeenquiries@heritage.org.nz

For other enquiries, email: information@heritage.org.nz

Christchurch City Council boundaries

Within the CCC boundaries, the Council provides:

  • guidance on making safe and repairing commercial and residential buildings
  • assistance in determining information requirements for insurance claims
  • advice on resource consent issues
  • information about the Heritage Incentive Grants Fund.

Contact the team on: heritage@ccc.govt.nz

Waimakariri District

Within Waimakariri District, the Council provides advice on:

  • available funding assistance
  • earthquake-prone buildings.

For advice on funding assistance, email: duty.planner@wmk.govt.nz

For advice on earthquake-prone buildings, email: office@wmk.govt.nz

Selwyn District

Within Selwyn District, the Council provides advice on:

  • available funding assistance
  • earthquake-prone buildings.

For advice on funding assistance, email: heritagefund@selwyn.govt.nz

For advice on earthquake-prone buildings, email: bca@selwyn.govt.nz


Updated on 23rd July 2015

Progress

This section provides an overview of major heritage achievements since the September 2010 earthquake.  Work that has already been done on the projects in the Heritage Recovery Programme is summarised in the project outlines.

The future of many heritage buildings in greater Christchurch has yet to be decided.  What is clear is that despite extensive losses, many heritage buildings on district plans survive, some in poor repair.  This section outlines the role of the partner agencies of the Heritage Recovery Programme in providing advice and distributing incentive funds on a contestable basis.

Providing expert advice to owners of heritage buildings and places

Following each major earthquake, heritage advisers and engineers working for Heritage New Zealand and the Christchurch City Council assessed the condition of Christchurch’s heritage buildings and provided advice to emergency authorities and owners.  Their initial focus was on assessing damage and stabilising damaged structures. Efforts have since moved to advising owners on restoring and strengthening heritage buildings where feasible.  Heritage New Zealand and CCC continue to provide free expert advice (see Free expert advice).

Providing heritage advice to CERA

Under section 38 of the CER Act, the Chief Executive of CERA (including his or her delegates) can carry out or commission works, including the demolition of buildings, structures or other erections on land.  An exercise of this power must be in accordance with the purposes of the CER Act and must be reasonably considered necessary.  CERA’s Chief Executive has no legal obligation to consult with, or obtain the consent of, the partner agencies (or any other party) for works under section 38 relating to heritage buildings.

Where possible CERA engages with the partner agencies that provide CERA with expert heritage advice before demolition of heritage buildings (see CERA decision-making process).  The final decision to demolish a heritage building lies with the Chief Executive of CERA.

Providing funds on a contestable basis

Many of the partner agencies provide other incentive funds for heritage conservation on a contestable basis. These are summarised in Financial assistance.


Updated on 23rd July 2015

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