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How we performed against our ‘outcomes’ = Tā mātou whakatutukitanga i ngā hua

How we performed against our ‘outcomes’ = mātou whakatutukitanga i ngā hua

This section of the annual report describes the Ministry’s performance against our goals and objectives (‘outcomes’) for 2010/11. It also describes how we worked to make our service delivery more effective and more efficient
(see page 16).

Outcome 1: Thriving producers and healthy cultural and sports organisations (Create)

Outcome 1 focuses on the production of cultural information, experiences, goods and services, and on the viability of cultural and sports organisations.

The Appropriations for Outcome 1

•  Delivery of Going Digital programme

•  Heritage services

•  Policy advice and monitoring of funded organisations.

The Government priorities supported by Outcome 1

•  Sustainable public broadcasters

•  Competition for quality in broadcasting

•  Improved viability of funded organisations

•  Lifting the performance of the public sector.

The Ministry’s 2010/11 performance against Outcome 1
 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Producing and publishing resources, both digital and non-digital, on New Zealand
and its culture and society
(eg, Te Ara – the online encyclopedia of New Zealand).

An increasing range of Ministry-produced reference resources from www.TeAra.govt.nz being used by more users more often.

2010/11 target1: 2.5 million visitors.

Four new reference resources were produced, covering Nelson, Hauraki-Coromandel, Marlborough and the East Coast.

Website visitors in 2010/11: 2.2 million.

Sustained cost-effectiveness2 of
www.NZHistory.net.nz and
www.TeAra.govt.nz.

For 2009/10 the cost-effectiveness trend was:

•  NZHistory – improving

•  TeAra – decreasing.

The target trend for both sites in 2010/11 was:

•  improving cost-effectiveness.

The overall cost-effectiveness of the NZHistory site increased in 2010/11:

•  costs increased 8%

•  users increased 17%

•  page views increased 3%.

The overall cost-effectiveness of the
Te Ara site increased in 2010/11:

•  costs increased 6%

•  users increased 27%

•  page views increased 19%.

 


1.  This target was established three months before the commencement of 2010/11, when it had been expected that we would report Te Ara website traffic using Google Analytics. At the commencement of the financial year a short time later, it was decided that we would use Nielsen Net Ratings to report Te Ara website traffic in 2010/11 in order to be consistent with our reporting of traffic on our other websites. If this decision had been made earlier, then a 2010/11 target of 2.0 million visits would have been established and published in the 2010/11 Estimates and 2011-2014 Statement of Intent.

2.  Cost-effectiveness relates to the unit cost of producing online history and reference resources relative to the number of visitors and pages viewed. Assessing cost-effectiveness is most relevant where the number of visitors and the level of engagement are significant. To assess cost-effectiveness we use data such as costs, number of visits, and the visitor experience (number of pages viewed is a proxy measure for the visitor experience).

 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Supporting funded agencies in improving their viability and measuring their performance.

Ministerial satisfaction that our monitoring of funded cultural organisations’ performance and our governance support is high-quality and improves the performance of cultural organisations.

We did not seek Ministerial feedback on these specific monitoring activities. However, Ministerial feedback on our policy-advice function, which incorporates the Ministry’s monitoring activities, was as follows:

•  Feedback from Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage:
Timeliness: Very good
Quality: Very good

•  Feedback from Minister of Broadcasting:
Timeliness: Very good
Quality: Good.

The National Pacific Radio Trust (NPRT) value for money review reported to Cabinet. The responsibility for monitoring NPRT was transferred to NZ On Air.

The Ministry provided advice and drafted a Cabinet paper on proposed changes to the Broadcasting Standards Authority’s functions
and processes. This included advice on changes to the standards for broadcasting
and for film and literature.

 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Expanding the Ministry’s engagement with Māori and
our focus on Māori language
and culture.

Engagement

Increased visibility of Māori culture in the Ministry’s work.

Engagement

We produced an implementation plan for developing cultural protocols and accords
in tandem with existing Treaty settlement processes.

We established a high-level working relationshipto support the accord between Te Puni Kōkiri and Manatū Taonga (the Ministry).

We held two hui with kaihautū from across the Arts, Culture and Heritage sector.

 

Māori language

Continued improvement in the Ministry’s internal capacity to support the Government’s Māori language revitalisation.

Te reo content on Ministry websites.

Māori language

We expanded te reo Māori training for our staff, to develop their competencies in Māori language and culture.

www.TeAra.govt.nz:

•  22 new entries were published in te reo;
we progressed the captioning of Māori biographies

•  one book, Māori and the Natural World –
Te Taiao,
was published from Te Ara content

•  Māori content for the ‘Roadside Stories’ project was added.

www.28MaoriBattalion.org.nz:

•  substantial user-generated content was added to the 28th Māori Battalion site, including content in te reo Māori

•  this site was awarded first prize in the Crown-Māori Relationship category of the IPANZ awards in May 2011.

 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Implementing the recommendations of the
Cultural Philanthropy Taskforce.

Increased philanthropic investment in
the sector.

Target: Benchmark to be set in 2010/11.

We conducted a 2010 ‘Cultural Organisations Giving and Sponsorship Survey’, which established the benchmark for philanthropic investment in the sector. Future surveys will measure changes in philanthropy in the sector.

The Ministry worked with The Arts Foundation, Creative New Zealand and Philanthropy New Zealand to develop a three-year programme of initiatives to increase the level of cultural philanthropy.

The Ministry partnered with Creative New Zealand on a fundraising capability-building initiative for cultural organisations.

We facilitated public and private discussions on cultural philanthropy, to increase the knowledge of both donors and donees of the benefits of tax mechanisms such as payroll-giving and tax rebates.

Potential philanthropists were informed about strategic and tax-efficient support to cultural organisations in Canterbury and elsewhere in New Zealand.

Implementing the outcomes of reviews of the Arts Council of
New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Act,
the Historic Places Act and the
NZ Film Commission.

There are more cultural producers and
they are prospering; there is a greater
range of cultural information, goods,
services and local broadcasting content,
and they are of higher quality.

During the year a new Arts Council of
New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Bill was drafted and introduced, to replace the existing Act. At the end of the year the Bill was awaiting its Second Reading.

Progress was made on drafting a Bill to amend the Historic Places Act.

During 2010/11 the Ministry, the Film Commission and key stakeholders worked
on responses to the New Zealand Film Commission Review Report by Sir Peter Jackson and David Court.

 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Reviewing the arrangements
for the Government’s support for contemporary popular music.

There are more cultural producers and
they are prospering; there is a greater
range of cultural information, goods,
services and local broadcasting content,
and they are of higher quality.

We advised the Government on how to achieve greater coherence among the agencies that fund contemporary New Zealand music. NZ On Air, the NZ Music Commission and Creative New Zealand have since developed terms of reference for delivering complementary programmes.

Broadcasting

Developing the policy settings for:

•  sustainable public broadcasters

•  effective contestable funding, and

•  giving TVNZ the flexibility to adapt to a changing market.

There are more cultural producers and
they are prospering; there is a greater
range of cultural information, goods,
services and local broadcasting content,
and they are of higher quality.

We advised the Government on the range of options for public service television post-June 2012, including:

•  funding

•  provision of a public service broadcasting channel.

Work on the Television New Zealand Amendment Bill was completed.

Broadcasting

Managing the transition to
digital television.

More consumers experiencing the
benefits of digital television.

The number of households converted to digital television increased from 70% in July 2010 to 76% in April 20113 (77% excluding Canterbury).

The public’s prompted awareness of ‘Going Digital’ increased from 35% in July 2010 to 50% in April 2011.

2,320 community contacts were made during the year.

The free-to-air digital terrestrial television network was extended during the year,
making the network available to over 86%
of the population.

The Ministry provided policy advice for the Ministry of Economic Development’s work on the allocation of spectrum released by the programme, and also for Cabinet papers on options for addressing Māori interests in the spectrum.

 

3.  The next reporting period is July 2011.

Outcome 2: Increased preservation of New Zealand’s culture, heritage and traditions (Preserve)

Outcome 2 focuses on the increased preservation of our heritage and traditions as a key driver of a thriving culture.

The Appropriations for Outcome 2

•  Heritage services

•  Policy advice and monitoring of funded organisations

•  Other expenses: regional museums.

The Government priorities supported by Outcome 2

•  Improved education and skills.

The Ministry’s 2010/11 performance against Outcome 2
 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Producing historical information
for schools and New Zealanders (The NZHistory site, oral histories, history publications).

An increasing range of Ministry-produced history resources (from www.NZHistory.net.nz) being used by more users more often.

Target 2010/11: 800,000 visitors.

Website visitors in 2010/11: 1.32 million.

Producing and publishing resources, both digital and non-digital, on New Zealand
and its culture and society
(eg, Te Ara – the online encyclopedia of New Zealand).

Sustained cost-effectiveness4 of
www.NZHistory.net.nz and
www.TeAra.govt.nz.

For 2009/10 the cost-effectiveness trend was:

•  NZHistory – improving

•  TeAra – decreasing.

The target trend for both sites in 2010/11 was:

•  improving cost-effectiveness.

The overall cost-effectiveness of the NZHistory site increased in 2010/11:

•  costs increased 8%

•  users increased 17%

•  page views increased 3%.

The overall cost-effectiveness of the Te Ara site increased in 2010/11:

•  costs increased 6%

•  users increased 27%

•  page views increased 19%.

Administering legislation to protect symbols of nationhood and movable and found cultural heritage.

Compliance with the Protected Objects Act.

Protection of movable heritage and taonga tūturu.

Targets for both in 2010/11: 100%.

Compliance with the Act in 2010/11: 100%.

Protection of movable heritage and taonga tūturu in 2010/11: 100%.

 

4.  Cost-effectiveness relates to the unit cost of producing online history and reference resources relative to the number of visitors and pages viewed. Assessing cost-effectiveness is most relevant where the number of visitors and the level of engagement are significant. To assess cost-effectiveness we use data such as costs, number of visits, and the visitor experience (number of pages viewed is a proxy measure for the visitor experience).

 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Maintaining access to memorials and other places of national significance.

Increased numbers of visitors to the National War Memorial.

Positive visitor perceptions of the
National War Memorial experience.

Target 2010/11: Sustain.

Visitors:

•  2009/10: 12,100

•  2010/11: 12,874.

Visitor perceptions:

•  2009/10: positive

•  2010/11: positive.

Promoting commemorations.

More New Zealanders are better
informed about significant
commemorations.

On the basis of the Ministry’s advice the Government approved the major and other commemorative events and anniversaries for 2011-2016.

Providing policy advice on the arrangements for objects and collections of national importance.

Management of New Zealand’s
cultural heritage is more efficient
and more effective.

An independent scoping report was completed on a policy framework for New Zealand’s war and military collections.

Reviewing the arrangements
for the Government’s support for audio-visual archiving.

Management of New Zealand’s
cultural heritage is more efficient
and more effective.

We reported to Ministers in May on establishing a centre of excellence for audio-visual archiving and on combining
the New Zealand Film Archive and the audio-visual archive activities of TVNZ and Radio New Zealand.

Outcome 3: New Zealanders increasingly valuing their arts, heritage, broadcasting, and sport (Value)

Outcome 3 focuses on New Zealanders valuing a thriving culture, as shown by increased consumption of cultural and sports activities. This outcome is advanced by increasing the coverage and range of cultural and sports activities and increasing the appreciation and consumption of those activities.

The Appropriations for Outcome 3

•  Cultural diplomacy international programme (CDIP)

•  Heritage services

•  Policy advice and monitoring of funded organisations.

The Government priorities supported by Outcome 3

•  Improved education and skills.

The Ministry’s 2010/11 performance against Outcome 3
 

Key services and initiatives

How we demonstrate success

Our performance in 2010/11

Increasing the awareness of
New Zealand among international audiences through international cultural diplomacy programmes.

Approved projects are completed.

2010/11 target: 100%.

An increased range of media coverage
of CDIP-funded initiatives.

An increased awareness of New Zealand
and its culture in key regions overseas.

In 2010/11, CDIP projects focused on promoting New Zealand’s culture leading up to, during and following the Rugby World Cup 2011. These projects will be completed and media coverage assessed after the World Cup.

Increasing the use of promotional resources and cultural event information (including among Māori and Pacific peoples).

Increasing numbers of users of the
cultural event information provided
on www.Eventfinder.co.nz.

Eventfinder users in 2010/11: 4 million.

(Note: Full-year data for 2009/10 is not available because www.NZLive.com was merged with www.Eventfinder.co.nz on
1 March 2010.)

Increasing the exposure of New Zealand’s culture during the Rugby World Cup 2011. (This was a strategic priority identified in the Ministry’s 2010/11 output plan.)

Increased appreciation of New Zealand
and its culture.

During 2010/11 the Ministry provided active coordination and leadership for the cultural sector’s contribution to the Rugby World Cup.

CDIP funding to ensure Māori participation
in the (RWC) Real NZ Festival events was provided to support the Te Waka Māori
events programme in Auckland and the
Te Matatini programme in Auckland and Wellington.

 

Broadcasting

Developing the policy settings
for an increased range of cultural content being enjoyed by more audiences.

Growth in audiences and increased appreciation of broadcasting content.

Disabilities Strategy

We investigated and supported options to enhance broadcasting services for people with sensory disabilities.

We liaised with TVNZ and SKY TV on making closed captions on free-to-air channels accessible on the MYSKYHDi platform.

Sustainable public broadcasting

See also the items on page 11 for developing the policy settings for sustainable public broadcasters.


Updated on 23rd July 2015