Skip to main content

How we performed against our impacts = Tā mātou whakatutukitanga ki ā mātou papātanga

The following outlines the Ministry's performance against our impacts, which show the more direct results of our activities that will contribute to each of our four outcomes. The Ministry has also identified key indicators that will tell us whether the Ministry’s desired impacts have been achieved. The Ministry’s outputs and supporting activities both directly and indirectly contribute to our outcomes. A number of these contribute across the arts, heritage, media and sport (cultural) outcomes as the Ministry’s activities are designed to encourage creation of, preservation of, and engagement in cultural activities.

This section also identifies the outputs that relate to each of the impacts. The Ministry’s performance against our output measures is reported in the Statement of Service Performance on pages 25 to 47.

In a year of fiscal constraint, the cultural sector faced the challenge of continuing to deliver within existing resourcing levels. For the Ministry, one way of helping organisations meet this challenge was to focus on efficiency, value for money and the potential for better collaboration.

The year was also dominated by a number of large-scale projects that recognised the importance of arts, culture and heritage to New Zealand’s society and economy: the Frankfurt Book Fair, planning for the First World War Centenary, and the recovery of Christchurch.

Impact: Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

· Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

· Collecting and preserving oral and digital stories of cultural importance to New Zealand in a form accessible to current generations.

· Administering the New Zealand Oral History Awards annually.

· Managing the maintenance of war graves in New Zealand and abroad, and the management of the National War Memorial.

· Maintaining the National War Memorial.

· Progressing the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial project.

· Developing policy to incentivise structural upgrading of heritage buildings as part of the review of the earthquake-prone building provisions of the Building Act 2004 (led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment).

· Administering legislation to protect symbols of nationhood and movable and found heritage.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage

· Maintain war graves and access to memorials and other places of national significance

Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

The Ministry continues to develop new topics for Te Ara and NZHistory as well as recording oral histories. The majority of the Ministry’s resources are published on the websites we run. The Ministry also encourages the community to contribute images, stories, and comments to our websites, including QuakeStories, 28th Māori Battalion, NZHistory, and Te Ara.

The following graph shows the cumulative number of histories, including web features and oral history interviews, recorded by the Ministry. This shows that the Ministry has continued to increase the number of histories it records.

Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

Websites

The Ministry produces a range of websites bringing New Zealand’s culture and heritage online. Over the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of visits to the Ministry’s websites. Total visits have increased from 3.737 million in 2008/09 to 7.774 million in 2012/13, representing a 108% increase.

The number of people using our information has continued to grow steadily over the past five years. Our websites have proven to be an effective channel of communication to increase people’s understanding of New Zealand’s heritage and culture. In our 2013 web satisfaction survey, we asked our website users what they thought was the best way of delivering content like ours, with options of Ebook, mobile app, printed book and website. 83.5% of respondents thought website was the best way.

National War Memorial

New Zealand’s National War memorial is located at Buckle Street in Wellington. The Memorial commemorates all New Zealanders who gave their lives in the South African War, the two World Wars, the conflicts in Malaysia and Vietnam, and on peace-keeping operations world-wide. The National War Memorial features a Carillon, Hall of Memories, and the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior. A National War Memorial Park to be based alongside the Memorial is currently under development.

There were 9,443 visits to the National War Memorial in Wellington in 2012/13. Visitor numbers decreased from previous years as a result of construction work being undertaken at the site.

The National War Memorial is currently closed pending seismic strengthening with a view to make it accessible again to visitors. The primary goal of a visit to the National War Memorial is to help visitors to remember and understand the New Zealand experience of war and its enduring impact on New Zealand society.

Book sales

The Ministry has helped to foster an increasing public appetite for printed information about New Zealand’s culture and heritage. A number of its print publications have been extremely popular: Frontier of Dreams (2005) has sold more than 26,000 copies; Nga Tama Toa (2008) 10,000 copies; and Māori Peoples of NZ (2006) and Trainland (2007) around 7,000 copies each. The Ministry’s total sales of all print publications is around 93,000 sales across 32 different products since 2004/05.

Public seminars

The Ministry hosted 9 public seminars during the year (2012: 11). These were on subjects ranging through history, economics, and science. Around 50-60 people (2012: 50-60 people) attend these seminars each time they are held.

Impact: People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· New Zealanders who access Ministry information and places the Ministry manages feel informed about their country, history and culture

· New Zealanders are switching to digital television

· Providing historical and cultural information that engages New Zealanders and international audiences, using a range of media, including print and digital.

· Producing and promoting significant cultural and historical resources and events, including First World War centenary commemorative digital and print projects.

· Progressing New Zealand’s First World War centenary commemorations projects, including National War Memorial Park.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of cultural sector services and activities, including visual, performing and literary arts, historic heritage, museum collections, taonga and whare taonga, cultural tourism, broadcasting and broadcasting standards.

· Scoping options for increasing the public accessibility of New Zealand’s audiovisual archives.

· Supporting New Zealanders to make the switchover to digital television by December 2013:

o  Implementing a full marketing and communications programme.

o  Undertaking community outreach facilities through our network of community advisors.

o   Delivering the Targeted Assistance Package to support vulnerable groups to go digital.

· Promotion of cultural events and significant commemorations

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

·Produce and promote cultural and historical resources

· Delivery of Going Digital Programme

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

New Zealanders who access Ministry information and places the Ministry manages feel informed about their country, history and culture

A survey of the Ministry’s website users was conducted during February and March 2013 to gain feedback about our websites and identify areas of development to be included in our programme of work. As part of this survey, we asked users how well informed they were about a variety of subjects. We also asked them how well informed they felt about New Zealand, its history, and its culture after using our websites, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, better informed, and extremely well informed. After viewing our websites, 97% of respondents felt at least ‘somewhat’ informed about New Zealand, its history and its culture, with 87% of respondents feeling either ‘better’ or ‘extremely’ well informed.

New Zealanders are switching to digital television

As the end of analogue television approaches, it is important all New Zealanders have the information and assistance they need to access digital television.

One of the Ministry's flagship programmes is Going Digital, responsible for transitioning New Zealand to digital television by the end of 2013. Going Digital operates a nationwide community outreach programme, supported by a comprehensive marketing programme featuring Seymour the digital dog.

The Targeted Assistance Package was launched in 2012 to provide technical and financial support to those groups most likely to face the greatest challenges in moving to digital television. From February 2012 to 30 June 2013, Going Digital provided more than 21,000 installations under the Targeted Assistance Package. The Targeted Assistance Package is now closed in Hawke’s Bay, the West Coast and the South Island.  

The number of households that have converted to digital television has increased from 70% in July 2010 to 94% in July 2013.

Hawke’s Bay and the West Coast were the first regions to go digital on 30 September 2012, followed by the rest of the South Island on 28 April 2013. The last two regions to go digital are the lower North Island and East Coast on 29 September 2013, followed by the upper North Island on 1 December 2013.

 

Impact: Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

New initiatives where culture helps achieve the goals of other sectors

Frankfurt Book Fair

·       Number of book rights sales to foreign buyers

· Preference of Germans for New Zealand as a travel destination

Rebuild Christchurch

· Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

· Providing advice on policy, funding and other opportunities to enhance the contribution of the cultural sector to the Government’s wider social and economic goals.

· Supporting the recovery from the Canterbury earthquakes by contributing to a range of cultural initiatives in greater Christchurch.

· Working with Auckland Council to develop and implement an arts and culture strategy for Auckland.

· Managing the presence of New Zealand as the host country at the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2012 to develop our presence in Germany and inspire tourism and investment from Europe, as well as other cultural diplomacy projects.

· Supporting an Auckland-based Sistema Aotearoa project and advising on options for expansion of the programme in other parts of New Zealand.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Delivery of international cultural diplomacy projects

Frankfurt Book Fair

New Zealand was the Guest Country of Honour at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair (FBF). Attended by around 300,000 people from 110 countries, the Frankfurt Book Fair is the world’s largest book fair and most prestigious annual publishing event.

New Zealand’s Guest of Honour project ran for the whole year leading up to the fair, presenting 80 New Zealand writers and many cultural performers in numerous events in Frankfurt and other centres throughout Germany and Europe. It provided an unprecedented opportunity not only to sell our books into international markets, but also to showcase New Zealand’s literature and culture, to promote trade and tourism and to strengthen our political ties with Germany.

The Frankfurt Book Fair project was a major focus for the Ministry during 2011/12 and the first half of 2012/13. As the lead agency, the Ministry formed a small team to run the project, in collaboration with a number of other government agencies in New Zealand and Germany.

New Zealand’s highly successful programme built awareness and interest throughout the year, peaking at the Book Fair with almost 68,000 people visiting the New Zealand pavilion over five days. The FBF organisers attributed the 6% overall increase in the FBF’s public attendance figures to New Zealand’s Guest of Honour presence and profile.    

Number of book rights sales to foreign buyers

The German translation rights for 83 New Zealand books were sold in the lead up to the Frankfurt Book Fair – an 800% increase on annual sales into Germany for the past 10 years. Since the Fair, there have been a further 22 German rights sales to 30 June 2013 – a total of 105 in all.

New Zealand rights sales into other territories were not measured before the October 2012 FBF. However, the 2012 FBF has resulted in 71 sales into other territories to 30 June 2013. That makes a total of 176 rights sales internationally that can be linked to New Zealand’s Guest of Honour presence at the FBF. This is almost double the Publishers Association of New Zealand (PANZ) target of 100 rights sales by the end of 2013.

It is expected that this number will continue to rise. New Zealand publishers report further rights deals are in negotiation or under discussion as a result of the FBF.

The geographic reach of deals done and in negotiation include: Germany, France, UK, USA, Canada, South Africa, Portugal, Spain, Croatia, Brazil, Poland, Sweden, The Netherlands, China, Italy, Japan, the Middle East, Slovenia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Korea, Taiwan, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Austria, and Norway.

Preference of Germans for New Zealand as a travel destination

Tourism New Zealand (TNZ) runs an “Active Considerer Monitor’ in six of TNZ’s key international markets, including Germany. The target audience is consumers who are actively considering New Zealand for a holiday in the near future. The monthly survey reports on New Zealand’s brand image and advertising effectiveness in each market. The July – November 2012 surveys in Germany also included specific questions on the Frankfurt Book Fair.

The results of the July- November 2012 surveys in Germany show the majority of active considerers (85% on average) were aware of the Frankfurt Book Fair. Awareness of New Zealand as the Guest of Honour for 2012 averaged 25%, peaking at 40% in October 2012. Interest among the active considerer market as a whole in visiting New Zealand remained at 12%. Among the German active considerer target group who were aware of New Zealand’s Guest of Honour status, there was an average 42% increase in interest in visiting New Zealand over the July – November 2012 period.

June 2013 figures from the same survey show a 64% preference for New Zealand. This preference is well above benchmarks for Germany and has shown steady improvement since 2012. Results for the quarter to June 2013 also show that 50% of Active Considerers associate New Zealand with the brand attribute “offers rich local arts and culture experiences” compared with 39% in the previous quarter.

Rebuild Christchurch

Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

Every three years, Creative New Zealand conducts its New Zealanders and the arts survey, which looks at attitudes, attendance and participation. The latest surveys were completed in 2011 and 2008. The 2008 data for Canterbury has been used as our baseline for attendance and participation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

In 2008, 81% of Christchurch residents attended an arts event in the last 12 months, and 44% participated in the arts over the last 12 months.

Audience figures for organisations funded through the Tōtara and Kahikatea investment programmes indicate that overall 2012 Canterbury arts audience numbers are returning to pre-earthquake levels, despite there being fewer events for people to attend.

Canterbury Attendances

2009

2010

2011

2012

Arts on Tour NZ

1,584

3,026

1,591

1,560

Chamber Music New Zealand

0

3,248

2,645

3,723

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra

22,754

18,016

8,540

19,974

Footnote Dance

0

282

0

450

National Theatre for Children

2,633

2,174

730

397

New Zealand String Quartet

781

1,112

314

362

NZ Youth Choir / Voices NZ Chamber Choir

0

3,250

2,380

1,300

The Court Theatre

100,323

81,048

33,860

98,808

The Physics Room

6,137

1,296

0

2,114

New Zealand Opera

879

0

0

0

Total

135,091

113,452

50,060

128,688

In 2007/08 Sport New Zealand conducted its Active New Zealand survey, which collects data on sport and recreation participation by New Zealand adults aged 16 years and over. The results for the Canterbury West Coast region have been used as our baseline for participation in sport and recreation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

In 2007/08, 79.6% of adults took part in at least one sport or recreation activity per week. Over a 12 month period, 85.2% of adults participated in at least two different types of sport and recreation activities, and, on average, adults participated in 4.6 different sport and recreation activities.

Sport New Zealand is currently conducting its 2013/14 Active New Zealand survey. The survey commenced in April 2013 and will finish in March 2014, with results to follow later in 2014.

Sport New Zealand conducted its Young People’s Survey in 2011, which surveyed over 17,000 students in primary, intermediate and secondary schools about their participation in sport and recreation. However, the results are under representative of Christchurch schools as many were not in a position to participate. A subsequent survey was conducted in 2012, with results currently being analysed.

The Ministry will report updated results of participation in sport and recreation at all levels across all of greater Christchurch as they become available.

The Ministry continues to lead two recovery programmes. These are:

·         Arts and Culture Recovery, which includes Culture and Heritage Collections, Creative and Cultural Activities and Spaces and the National Earthquake Memorial; and

·         Heritage Buildings and Cultural Heritage Places Recovery Programme.

These two programmes along with the Spaces and Places and People Plan for Sport and Recreation in Greater Christchurch, form the cultural recovery component of the overarching Recovery Strategy for Greater Christchurch:  Te Mahere Haumanutanga o Waitaha (Recovery Strategy).

The National Earthquake Memorial, while led by the Ministry under the Arts and Culture Recovery programme is also a Christchurch Central Development Unit (CCDU) project and is linked to both the Heritage Building and Cultural Heritage Places Programme and the Avon River Park Precinct Anchor Project.

The Ministry is also a member of the Sensitive Sites Cross-Agency Group, and provides input and advice to the Art Trail of the Avon River Park Precinct.

While progress on both recovery programmes has been slowed by complexity of the issues surrounding Canterbury, the Ministry will be in a position to take both programmes out for consultation before December 2013.

To support its work in Canterbury, the Ministry implemented two significant actions in 2012/13.  It:

·         Resourced a principal advisor to work at least two days per week in Christchurch; and

·         Established a Joint-Agency Group (JAG) consisting of representatives from the Ministry, Christchurch City Council, CERA, CCDU and Creative New Zealand. This group consults with the District Councils of Waimakariri and Selwyn and other relevant agencies as required. JAG considers projects and plans within the cultural sector and provides a consistent and collective message to project organisers reducing duplication and ensuring information is shared between agencies.

Impact: New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders

· Māori who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed

· Producing digital and print publications which showcase Māori culture, history, and language.

· Scoping the Treaty Settlement Histories oral, print, and digital projects, to be developed over the next two to three years.

· Co-ordinating wānanga, to assure the quality of content across the Ministry’s cultural publications.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of Māori culture and heritage, including researching and advising on approaches to whare taonga initiatives.

· Encouraging the use of and access to te reo in the work and workplaces of agencies funded through the Ministry.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Produce and promote cultural and historical resources and events

· Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage

People who access Ministry information about the Treaty Settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders

During 2013 the Ministry was in the process of establishing the Treaty Settlement Histories project. Over the next three years, the Ministry will be producing oral histories on the Treaty settlement process, as well as other Treaty settlement print and digital projects.

In March 2013, the Ministry asked users of the Ministry’s websites how well informed they were about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, well informed, extremely well informed. 48.5% of respondents consider that they are well informed or extremely well informed about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process.

Māori who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed

The Ministry is responsible for managing taonga under the Protected Objects Act 1975, which regulates:

·; the export of protected New Zealand objects;

·; the illegal export and import of protected New Zealand and foreign objects; and

· the sale, trade and ownership of taonga tūturu, including what to do if you find a taonga or Māori artefact.

Our work in this area ensures significant movable heritage subject to the Protected Objects Act is not lost overseas.

In March 2013, the Ministry conducted a survey asking respondents to rate our work in this area using a scale of very poorly, poorly, well, very well. 72% of Māori respondents and 68% of New Zealanders rated this as well or very well.

Impact: A joined-up cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

· Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

· Developing a strategy to frame and drive the Government’s investments in New Zealand’s culture.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation, and funding to enhance sector coherence and infrastructure.

· Supporting the Heritage Forum to identify and manage priority work across the heritage sector.

· Improving funded agencies’ strategic planning and performance reporting frameworks through collaboration and support.

· Advising on mechanisms for sustaining the performance and financial strength of key cultural sector agencies, through agency cooperation and development of shared service arrangements, and assisting the cultural sector to diversify revenues.

· Undertaking reviews and making improvements in cultural areas, including the professional orchestra and screen sectors.

· Working with key agencies to increase levels of private and philanthropic giving in the wider cultural sector.

· Advising on the appointment of Board members for Crown-connected agencies.

· Advising on and administering legislation for the cultural Crown entities.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Performance monitoring and development of arts, heritage, media and sport Vote-funded agencies

· Advice on and processing of arts, heritage, media and sport board appointments

· Negotiated services to support Ministers including speeches and correspondence

Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

In order to thrive, cultural organisations need sufficient resources. As well as self-generated income such as ticket sales, many organisations rely heavily on government support. Both central and local government invest in a wide range of cultural organisations. However, more could be achieved if the funding base was increased.

The Ministry is leading a cross-agency shared cultural philanthropy work programme to implement recommendations made by the Cultural Philanthropy Taskforce. These initiatives are well underway. Together they are laying the groundwork for growing the culture of giving, and asking, in New Zealand. A caveat is that fully tapping into the significant potential for private giving to boost cultural activity will require a long-term, sustained approach as well as on-going reinforcement (such as continuing to promote knowledge of tax mechanisms and to recognise and value the generosity of philanthropists). The drive to improve New Zealand’s private sector support for culture is still in its infancy, and could take at least five to ten years to make a significant difference.

In March-April 2009 the Ministry surveyed cultural organisations on the income they had obtained from gifts, grants and other charitable and sponsorship sources in the tax year of 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008. The Ministry invited around 2,000 cultural organisations to take part in the survey.  As a result 480 valid responses were obtained. 

 

Private or philanthropic giving is contributions received from trusts/foundations, corporate organisations, and individuals. In the 2007/08 tax year the level of private or philanthropic giving was $49.2 million, which represented 13% of total contributions received.

A subsequent survey was completed in 2012. The Ministry again invited around 2,000 cultural organisations to take part in the survey. As a result 801 valid responses were obtained. The results are currently being analysed.

Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

The Government continues its commitment to enhancing the performance of the public sector. In light of this and the constrained fiscal environment, the Ministry has worked with cultural sector organisations to improve coordination across the sector.

As at February 2012 there were 56 collaborative arrangements in place between agencies. These included shared systems, functions and individuals working across agencies in areas such as finance and communications. The number of collaborative arrangements increased to 91 in January 2013 and 121 in June 2013. While this number is increasing, over time this number is expected to decrease as greater efficiencies are established and multiple arrangements are consolidated into one arrangement. Although the number of arrangements will decrease, coordination and efficiencies across the funded agencies will increase as a result of greater collaboration.

The key areas where changes are leading to strengthened performance and more collaborative arrangements are:

Heritage Forum

The Government has indicated a need for closer integration between public agencies and a more coherent approach to policy development. In 2011/12, the Ministry established the Heritage Forum to forge stronger links and more coherence across the sector, and to be a visible presence promoting government heritage interests at a national level.

Over the past 12 months, the Forum has continued to build on its role and has now established a strategic sector-based work programme. 

Orchestral review

During 2011/12, the Ministry embarked on a review of New Zealand’s professional orchestral sector. The aim of this review was to examine whether the current model – one national and four regional orchestras – is optimal in ensuring New Zealand audiences have access to high-quality, cost-effective orchestral services.

During 2011/12, the Ministry developed terms of reference and established a reference group. We worked with consultant Avi Shoshani (Secretary General of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra), the orchestras and other stakeholders, and drafted a discussion paper outlining some of the challenges facing the sector and four possible scenarios for change.

The Ministry completed the Review of the Professional Orchestra Sector during 2012/13. The Review discussion document received 2,000 submissions. These submissions, together with economic analysis and input from the Review reference group and Creative New Zealand, helped inform our recommendations. In February 2013 the Minister endorsed the Final Report, including its 19 recommendations, and released it publicly. 

The Review concluded that the current model of one national, touring orchestra and four city-based orchestras remains the best way of ensuring New Zealanders have access to high quality orchestral music. It found there was considerable scope for the orchestras to work more collaboratively in areas such as programming, professional development and career development to ensure the best use of public money invested in them. The review also defines roles for a national, a metropolitan and city-based orchestras.

Work on implementing the Review’s findings and recommendations will be completed by January 2015. This includes the Ministry and Creative New Zealand implementing a joint policy and funding framework for orchestras.  

Legislative change for the cultural sector

During 2012/13 the Ministry progressed a number of proposals for legislative change in the cultural sector.  

The Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Bill, which replaces the Historic Places Act 1993, was reported back from the Local Government and Environment Committee on 20 June 2013 and awaits its second reading.  The Bill reforms the governance arrangements of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust and changes the name of the Trust to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.  It also streamlines archaeological consenting processes, establishes an emergency authority process, and modernises other provisions of the Act.  The Bill, as reported back by the Select Committee, also proposes the establishment of a list of New Zealand’s most important historic places to be entitled ‘National Historic Landmarks/Ngā Manawhenua o Aotearoa me ōna Kōrero Tūturu’.

The Cultural Property (Protection in Armed Conflict Act) 2012 came into force on 1 July 2013. The provisions in this Act enable New Zealand to accede to the First and Second Protocols to the 1954 Hague Convention on the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict.  The objective of the Convention is to provide a regime that will protect cultural property of significance in times of armed conflict. The Convention is supplemented by two protocols.

The National War Memorial Park (Pukeahu) Empowering Act 2012 came into force on 4 October 2012.  The Act empowers the creation of the National War Memorial Park (Pukeahu).  The Memorial Park is the Government’s key project to acknowledge the Centenary of the First World War, and will be completed in time to be the centrepiece of Anzac Day commemorations in 2015.

The Ministry also progressed an amendment to the Flags, Emblems, and Names Protection Act 1981 in the Statutes Amendment Bill in 2012/13.  The proposed amendment protects against the unauthorised use of the name and emblem of the 28th Māori Battalion.  The Statutes Amendment Bill was reported back from the Government Administration Committee on 11 June 2013 and had its second reading on 10 July 2013.


Updated on 23rd July 2015