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How we performed against our impacts = Tā mātou whakatutukitanga ki ā mātou papātanga

The following outlines the Ministry's performance against our impacts, showing the more direct results of our activities which will contribute to each of our four outcomes. The Ministry has also identified key indicators which will tell us whether the Ministry’s desired impacts have been achieved. The Ministry’s outputs and supporting activities both directly and indirectly contribute to our outcomes. A number of these contribute across the arts, heritage, media and sport (cultural) outcomes as the Ministry’s activities are designed to encourage creation of, preservation of, and engagement in, cultural activities.This section also identifies the outputs that relate to each of the impacts. The Ministry’s performance against our output measures is reported in the Statement of Service Performance on pages 21 to 41.

In a year of fiscal constraint, the cultural sector faced the challenge of continuing to deliver within existing resourcing levels. For the Ministry, one way of helping organisations meet this challenge was to focus on efficiency, value for money and the potential for better collaboration.

Impact: Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations
 

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

· Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

· Collecting and preserving oral and digital stories of cultural importance to New Zealand in a form accessible to current generations.

· Administering the annual New Zealand Oral History Awards.

· Managing the maintenance of war graves in New Zealand and abroad.

· Maintaining the National War Memorial.

· Contributing to the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial project.

· Developing policy to incentivise structural upgrading of heritage buildings as part of the review of the earthquake-prone building provisions of the Building Act 2004 (led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment).

· Administering legislation to protect symbols of nationhood, and movable and found heritage.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage

· Maintain war graves and access to memorials and other places of national significance

Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

The Ministry continues to increase the number of histories it records. Over the next four years the Ministry will produce significant new work in both print and digital format on New Zealand’s First World War history and heritage, as well as maintaining and developing the Te Ara and NZHistory websites and recording oral histories.

The Ministry will also produce a book based on oral history interviews recorded for the “Remembering Christchurch Oral History Project” and we have progressed two other oral history projects – the “Treaty Settlement Histories Project” and a commissioned “Department of Corrections Oral History Project”.

The Ministry will also continue to encourage the community to contribute images, stories, and comments to our websites, including QuakeStories, 28 Māori Battalion, NZHistory, and Te Ara.

The graph below shows the trend in the cumulative number of histories recorded by the Ministry since 1 July 2008.

Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

Websites

The Ministry produces a range of websites bringing New Zealand’s culture and heritage online. Over the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of visits to the Ministry’s websites. Total visits have increased from 3.7 million in 2008/09 to 9.2 million in 2013/14, representing an increase of nearly 150%. Total visits are projected to be 10.5 million in 2014/15.

 

Other websites include – 28 Māori Battalion, Anzac Day, Vietnam War, NZ at Frankfurt, QuakeStories and WW100.

 

Our websites have proven to be an effective channel of communication to increase people’s understanding of New Zealand’s heritage and culture.

National War Memorial

New Zealand’s National War Memorial is located at Buckle Street in Wellington. The Memorial commemorates all New Zealanders who gave their lives in the South African War, the two World Wars, the conflicts in Malaysia and Vietnam, and on peace-keeping operations worldwide. The National War Memorial features a Carillon, a Hall of Memories, and the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior.

The primary goal of the Memorial is to help visitors remember and understand the New Zealand experience of war and its enduring impact on New Zealand society. There were 5,394 visits to the National War Memorial in Wellington in 2013/14 (2012/13: 9,443 visits). The Memorial was largely closed during 2013/14 for seismic strengthening and refurbishment, and this work is continuing into 2014/15.   The Memorial will re-open in April 2015 and will experience an increase in visitors as people visit the new National War Memorial Park (Pukeahu) after the Park opens in April 2015.

Book sales

The Ministry has helped to foster an increasing public appetite for printed information about New Zealand’s culture and heritage. A number of our print publications have been extremely popular: Frontier of Dreams (2005) has sold more than 26,000 copies; Nga Tama Toa (2008) 10,000 copies; and Māori Peoples of New Zealand (2006) and Trainland (2007) around 7,000 copies each. New Zealand and the First World War (2013) sold out its first print run of 5,000 copies and another 2,500 copies were printed. The Ministry’s total sales of all print publications is more than 100,000 sales across 34 different products since 2004/05.

Public talks

The Ministry arranged nine public talks during 2013/14 on subjects ranging through social history, war history and international relations. Each was attended by 50-60 people (2012/13: 50-60 people).

Impact: People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

 

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· New Zealanders who access Ministry information and places the Ministry manages feel informed about their country, history and culture

· New Zealanders are switching to digital television

· Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

· Providing historical and cultural information which engages New Zealanders and international audiences, using a range of media, including print and digital.

· Progressing New Zealand’s First World War centenary commemorations projects:

o   Heritage trails on the Western Front and Gallipoli;

o   Memorial Precinct education interpretation centre; and

o   National War Memorial Park.

· Producing and promoting significant cultural and historical resources and events, including First World War centenary commemorative digital and print projects.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of cultural sector services and activities, including visual, performing and literary arts, historic heritage, museum collections, taonga and whare taonga, cultural tourism, broadcasting and broadcasting standards.

· Review current governance arrangements and legislation for the Waitangi National Trust.

· Scoping options for increasing the public accessibility of New Zealand’s audiovisual archives.

· Supporting New Zealanders to make the switchover to digital television by December 2013:

o   Implementing a full marketing and communications programme.

o   Undertaking community outreach facilities through our network of community advisors.

o   Delivering the Targeted Assistance Package to support vulnerable groups to go digital.

·  Promote cultural events and significant commemorations

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Produce and promote cultural and historical resources

· Delivery of Going Digital Programme

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

New Zealanders who access Ministry information and places the Ministry manages feel informed about their country, history and culture

In 2014, a survey of the Ministry’s website users was conducted to gain feedback about our websites and identify areas of development to be included in our programme of work.  As part of this survey, we asked users how well informed they were about a variety of subjects. We also asked them how well informed they felt about New Zealand, its history, and its culture after using our websites, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, better informed, and extremely well informed.  After viewing our websites, 89.8% (2013: 97%) of respondents felt at least ‘somewhat’ informed about New Zealand, its history and its culture, with 60.6% (2013: 87%) of respondents feeling either ‘better’ or ‘extremely’ well informed. While the 2014 survey ratings are still satisfactory, we will be reviewing the possible reasons for the decline from 2012/13 so that we can address the issues identified in 2014/15.

New Zealanders are switching to digital television

One of the Ministry's flagship programmes, which ended during the year, was Going Digital.  The programme was responsible for transitioning New Zealand to digital television, with the final regional switchover occurring at 2am on 1 December 2013.  Going Digital operated a nationwide community outreach programme, supported by a comprehensive marketing programme featuring Seymour the digital dog.

The Targeted Assistance Package was launched in 2012 to provide technical and financial support to those groups most likely to face the greatest challenges in moving to digital television. In total, more than 32,000 eligible households received in-home assistance.

The number of households which have converted to digital television has increased from 70% in July 2010 to 98% by the completion of the programme.

Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

A nationwide online survey of New Zealanders’ attitudes and beliefs about the First World War was conducted in November/December 2012.  A total of 4,017 responses were received from New Zealanders aged 15 years and over.  The sample was representative of the New Zealand population aged over 15 by region,

age, gender, and ethnicity.  The survey measured respondents’ understanding of the First World War, and their attitudes and preferences for commemorating the centenary of the First World War. 

The survey results indicated that, on a self-report basis:

• 2.4% of respondents had never heard of the First World War.

• 15.7% of respondents had no real knowledge of the First World War.

• 48.9% of respondents had a basic understanding of the First World War.

• 24.9% of respondents had a reasonable understanding of the First World War.

• 6.9% of respondents had a reasonably advanced understanding of the First World War.

• 1.2% of respondents had an expert knowledge of the First World War, including its causes, the reason for New Zealand’s involvement, and the campaigns and major battles fought by New Zealanders.

This survey establishes a baseline understanding from which to measure the impact of the First World War Centenary Programme.  A follow-up survey will be conducted at the completion of the centenary period (2018).  The Programme aims to increase the percentage of respondents indicating they have a reasonable, or reasonably advanced, level of understanding about the First World War at the end of the centenary period.  A similar approach has been taken in both Australia and the United Kingdom.

National War Memorial Park

Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and its impact on New Zealand will be enhanced by the National War Memorial Park (Pukeahu), which is due to be completed in April 2015.  Construction of the Park is being managed by the New Zealand Transport Agency on behalf of the Ministry, and has progressed well in 2013/14.

Pukeahu sits within the wider context of the National War Memorial Precinct.  The vision for the Precinct is that it will be the national place for New Zealanders to remember and reflect on this country’s experience of war, military conflict and peacekeeping, and how that experience shapes our ideals and sense of national identity.  Visitors to the Precinct will be engaged through onsite and online material.

Impact: Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment
 

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

· Providing advice on policy, funding and other opportunities to enhance the contribution of the cultural sector to the Government’s wider social and economic goals.

· Supporting the recovery from the Canterbury earthquakes by contributing to a range of cultural initiatives in greater Christchurch.

· Working with Auckland Council to develop and implement an arts and culture strategy for Auckland.

· Supporting an Auckland-based Sistema Aotearoa project and advising on options for expansion of the programme in other parts of New Zealand.

· Managing the Cultural Diplomacy International Programme to achieve desired outcomes.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Delivery of international cultural diplomacy projects

Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

Every three years, Creative New Zealand conducts its New Zealanders and the Arts survey, which looks at attitudes, attendance and participation. The latest surveys were completed in 2011 and 2008[1]. In 2011, 68% of Christchurch residents attended an arts event in the last 12 months (down from 81% in 2008). In 2011, 38% had participated in the arts over the last 12 months (down from 44% in 2008).

It is not surprising that attendance and participation in Christchurch arts’ events declined between 2008 and 2011, given a lack of appropriate venues, a reduction in cultural events on offer and financial and transport barriers post-earthquakes.

More recent attendance figures (drawn from Creative New Zealand’s Tōtara and Kahikatea investment programmes) indicate a rebound in Christchurch audience numbers since 2011.  However, for some cultural organisations, attendance numbers have not yet recovered to their pre-earthquake levels.

 

Greater Christchurch Attendance 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Arts on Tour NZ 1,584 3,026 1,591 1,560 2,027
Chamber Music New Zealand - 3,248 2,645 3,723 4,733
Christchurch Symphony Orchestra 22,754 18,016 8,540 19,974 14,222
Footnote Dance - 282 - 450 -
National Theatre for Children 2,633 2,174 730 397 1,576
New Zealand String Quartet 781 1,112 314 362 447
NZ Youth Choir / Voices NZ Chamber Choir - 3,250 2,380 1,300 -
The Court Theatre 100,323 81,048 33,860 98,808 97,726
The Physics Room 6,137 1,296 - 2,114 10,507
Total 134,212 113,452 50,060 128,688 131,238

In 2007/08[2] Sport New Zealand conducted its Active New Zealand survey, which collects data on sport and recreation participation by New Zealand adults aged 16 years and over.

In 2007/08, 79.6% of adults took part in at least one sport or recreation activity per week. Over a 12 month period, 85.2% of adults participated in at least two different types of sport and recreation activities, and, on average, adults participated in 4.6 different sport and recreation activities.

In 2013/14, Sport New Zealand conducted its latest Active New Zealand survey. The survey results will follow later in 2014.

Sport New Zealand conducted its latest Young People’s Survey in 2011 asking young people about their participation in sport and active recreation.

For Greater Christchurch, results show that:

• over 6 out of 10 (63.9%) young people in the region spent 3+ hours a week on informal sport and recreation

• over 5 out of 10 (54.6%) young people in the region spent 3+ hours a week on organised sport and recreation.

Impact: New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced
 

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the Treaty Settlement process for the management and protection of Māori culture and heritage

· Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared and managed

· Producing digital and print publications which showcase Māori culture, history, and language.

· Producing Treaty Settlement Histories oral, print, and digital projects.

· Co-ordinating wānanga, to assure the quality of content across the Ministry’s cultural publications.

· Developing and implementing a guide to improve the quality of the Minister’s policy advice relating to Treaty and Māori issues.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of Māori culture and heritage, including researching and advising on approaches to whare taonga initiatives.

· Encouraging the use of and access to te reo in the work and workplaces of agencies funded through the Ministry.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Produce and promote cultural and historical resources and events

· Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage

People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the Treaty Settlement process for the management and protection of Māori culture and heritage

The Ministry has developed its Treaty Settlement Histories project and will be producing oral histories of the Treaty settlement process, as well as other Treaty settlement print and digital projects.

The Ministry already has some information on Treaty settlements on existing websites and our website survey asks respondents how well this content informs them about the Treaty settlement process, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, well informed, and extremely well informed.  In June 2014 responses indicated 37.6% of respondents (2013: 48.5%) consider that they are well informed or extremely well informed about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process.  82.8% of respondents considered the content made them at least somewhat informed (2013: 90.7%).  While the 2014 survey ratings are still satisfactory, we will be reviewing the possible reasons for the decline from 2012/13 so that we can address the issues identified in 2014/15.

Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared and managed

The Ministry is responsible for managing taonga under the Protected Objects Act 1975, which regulates:

• the export of protected New Zealand objects;

• the illegal export and import of protected New Zealand and foreign objects; and

• the sale, trade and ownership of taonga tūturu, including what to do if you find a taonga or Māori artefact.

Our work in this area ensures significant movable heritage subject to the Protected Objects Act is not lost overseas.

In 2013 and 2014, the Ministry conducted a survey asking respondents to rate our work in this area using a scale of very poor, poor, well, very well.  In June 2014, 51.3% of iwi-Māori respondents (2013: 72%) and 47.4% of all respondents (2013: 68%) rated this as well or very well.  We will be reviewing the possible reasons for the decline from 2012/13 so that we can address the issues identified in 2014/15.

Impact: A joined-up cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility
 

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we have been doing

Ministry outputs

· Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

· Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

· Developing a strategy to frame and drive the Government’s investments in New Zealand’s culture.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation, and funding to enhance sector coherence and infrastructure.

· Supporting the Heritage Forum to identify and manage priority work across the heritage sector.

· Improving funded agencies’ strategic planning and performance reporting frameworks through collaboration and support.

· Advising on mechanisms for sustaining the performance and financial strength of key cultural sector agencies, through agency cooperation and development of shared service arrangements, and assisting the cultural sector to diversify revenues.

· Working with key agencies to increase levels of private and philanthropic giving in the wider cultural sector.

· Advising on the appointment of Board members for Crown-connected agencies.

· Advising on and administering legislation for the cultural Crown entities.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Performance monitoring and development of arts, heritage, media and sport Vote-funded agencies

· Advice on and processing of arts, heritage, media and sport board appointments

· Negotiated services to support Ministers including speeches and correspondence

Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

To thrive, cultural organisations need sufficient resources. As well as self-generated income such as ticket sales, many organisations rely heavily on government support. Both central and local government invest in a wide range of cultural organisations. However, more could be achieved if the funding base was increased.

The Ministry is continuing to lead a cross-agency cultural philanthropy work programme to implement recommendations made by the Cultural Philanthropy  Taskforce. These initiatives are well underway. Together they are laying the groundwork for growing the culture of giving, and asking, in New Zealand. Fully tapping into the significant potential for private giving to boost cultural activity will require an ongoing, sustained approach (such as continuing to promote knowledge of tax mechanisms and to recognise and value the generosity of philanthropists).

In late 2012, the Ministry surveyed cultural organisations on the level of support received from main sources over the past financial year. A total of 236 arts and heritage organisations who completed the 2012 survey also responded to the Ministry’s 2008 survey (covering the 2007/08 financial year).

The figure below shows the main funding sources received by these organisations in 2012.

2011/12 support from private/philanthropic giving and government as a proportion of the total income of arts and heritage organisations (longitudinal respondents)

 

 

Private or philanthropic giving includes contributions received from trusts/foundations; corporate organisations; and individuals, couples or families. In 2011/12, support received from private and philanthropic sources accounted for 13% of the total level of income of arts and heritage organisations. This included 5% from trusts, foundations and other philanthropic organisations, 5% from corporate organisations, and 3% from individuals, couples or families.

The 41% of income of the arts and heritage organisations from “other sources” included earnings from box office sales, hire or fee revenue, bar sales, programme or merchandise sales, asset sales, and interest received on investments.

As the table on the next page shows, the level of private and philanthropic support for arts organisations declined between 2008 and 2012. The decline occurred in the context of an overall decline in economic growth during this period.

Among heritage organisations, the level of support received from trusts and foundations, and individuals, couples or families increased between 2008 and 2012. However, the level of support received from corporates declined between 2008 and 2012.  The difference in the level of corporate giving to heritage organisations between 2008 and 2012 can be ascribed to larger donations by two organisations in 2008 ($6.7 million, compared to $2.6 million in 2012). If the impact of these donations are removed, the level of corporate giving was largely unchanged between 2008 and 2012. The increase in the level of government support for heritage organisations was largely due to an increase in the level of central government support to the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa between 2008 and 2012.

2008 and 2012 support from private/philanthropic giving and government for arts and heritage organisations (longitudinal respondents)

    2007/08
$m
2011/12*
$m
Difference
Arts
All private/philanthropic 24.3 21.4 -2.8
Trusts/foundations 9.7 8.3 -1.4
Corporates 10.4 9 -1.4
Individuals, couples or families 4.1 4 -0.1
Government and local government bodies 35.1 34.6 -0.5
Heritage
All private/philanthropic 11.8 8.8 -3.1
Trusts/foundations 2.5 3.3 0.8
Corporates 7.2 2.9 -4.3
Individuals, couples or families 2.1 2.5 0.4
Government and local government bodies 58.2 71.7 13.5


* 2011/12 figures have been adjusted for inflation to enable a comparison of the level of spending between 2008 & 2012.
Please note that these results relate to a relatively small number of organisations and may not represent all arts and heritage organisations.
 

Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

The Government continues its commitment to enhancing the performance of the public sector. In light of this and the constrained fiscal environment, the Ministry has worked with cultural sector organisations to improve coordination across the sector.

As at December 2012 there were 56 collaborative arrangements in place between agencies. These included shared systems, functions and individuals working across agencies in areas such as finance and communications. The number of collaborative arrangements has increased to 113 in June 2014. While this number has increased from December 2012, over time this number is expected to decrease as greater efficiencies are established and multiple arrangements are consolidated into one arrangement.

Heritage Forum

The Government has indicated a need for closer integration between public agencies and a more coherent approach to policy development. In 2011/12, the Ministry established the Heritage Forum to forge stronger links and more coherence between government heritage agencies and across the sector, and to be a visible presence promoting heritage interests at a national level.

In 2013/14 the Ministry increased its support for the Forum. This enabled the Forum to refresh its focus and begin developing a new strategic work programme for 2014/15 and future years.

Legislative change for the cultural sector

During 2013/14 the Ministry progressed a number of proposals for legislative change in the cultural sector. 

The Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Act 2014 went through its final Parliamentary stages, and came into force on 1 May 2014, three months after Royal assent on 31 January 2014. The 2014 Act streamlines the governance of Creative New Zealand by establishing a single governance body with 13 members.  The previous structure consisted of four governing boards with 28 members.

The Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 received Royal assent on 19 May 2014 and came into force on 20 May 2014. The Act reforms the governance arrangements of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust and changes the name of the Trust to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.  It also streamlines archaeological consenting processes, establishes an emergency authority process, and modernises other provisions of the Act.  Among other changes, the Act introduces the new category of wahi tupuna to better recognise Maori heritage, confirms Heritage New Zealand’s role in providing advice on heritage matters in national and local emergencies, and increases penalties for breaches of statutory requirements. The Act also establishes a list of New Zealand’s most important historic places to be entitled ‘National Historic Landmarks/Ngā Manawhenua o Aotearoa me ōna Kōrero Tūturu’. The Act replaces the Historic Places Act 1993 and revokes the Historic Places Trust Elections Regulations 1993 (SR 1993/302).

The Cultural Property (Protection in Armed Conflict Act) 2012 came into force on 1 July 2013. The provisions in this Act enable New Zealand to accede to the First and Second Protocols to the 1954 Hague Convention on the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict.  The objective of the Convention is to provide a regime that will protect cultural property of significance in times of armed conflict. The Convention is supplemented by two protocols.

Two associated legislative instruments came into force on 1 July 2013, namely the Cultural Property (Protection in Armed Conflict) (Convention Emblem) Regulations 2013(SR 2013/193); and the Cultural Property (Protection in Armed Conflict) (Forms) Regulations 2013(SR 2013/194).

An order in council was made under the National War Memorial Park (Pukeahu) Empowering Act on 30 June 2014, and is deemed to have come into force on 24 February 2014. The National War Memorial Park (Pukeahu) Empowering Act Order was made pursuant to section 25 of the Act. The Order in Council is required to ensure the National War Memorial Park is completed on time, that is, by April 2015, the centenary of the commencement of the Gallipoli campaign of the First World War. The Order grants resource consents to the Ministry for Culture and Heritage to relocate a former Home of Compassion crèche building, as intended when the Park design was certified. It also grants consent for associated landscaping and strengthening work.

Section 18A of the Flags, Emblems, and Names Protection Act 1981 was inserted on 5 December 2013 through the Statutes Amendment Bill. Section 18A provides protections against unauthorised use of words and emblems relating to 28 Māori Battalion.

The Waitangi National Trust Board Amendment Bill was drafted over this period and introduced on 7 November 2013.  The First Reading was held on 9 April 2014, and the Bill is now being considered by the Māori Affairs Select Committee. The Bill addresses a potential conflict between the constitutional and trusteeship roles of the Governor-General and Ministers as ex officio members of the Waitangi National Trust Board. The Bill also provides for the Trust Deed and the Waitangi National Trust Board Act 1932 to provide fixed terms of appointment for Board members.

The Radio New Zealand Amendment Bill is before the House, awaiting its Second Reading.

 


Source: Creative New Zealand

[1]The 2008 data is used as our baseline for attendance and participation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

[2]The 2007/08 data is used as our baseline for participation in sport and recreation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.


Updated on 23rd July 2015