Skip to main content

Impacts, measures and targets

Impacts, measures and targets

How will we demonstrate success?

Outlined in the table below are the impact measures identified for the Ministry, which are based on the planned work programme below. These indicators help us measure our progress towards the intended outcomes.

We have selected these indicators to give indicators of this progress, taking into account data availability. We have refined the indicators over the last year, in particular to reflect some changes in data availability.

Where it is available, we have provided a baseline for the indicators by showing trends in the data available. We will report on our progress against these indicators in our Annual Reports. However, as they are medium to long-term indicators, we expect progress on most of them only over a three to five-year timeframe. Data may not be available each year and therefore we will report new information where it is available.

This progress will also depend on external factors as well as the Ministry’s efforts, and will be particularly affected by economic challenges in the current climate.

Our Annual Reports will also report on our output performance indicators, as projected in the Information Supporting the Estimates of Appropriations for both of our Votes.

Measuring progress against the Ministry impact indicators

Ministry outcomes

Measures

Targets

Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations

A – Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

Increasing

B – Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

Increasing

People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

C – New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel informed about their country, history and culture

Increasing

D – New Zealanders are switching to digital television

 98% by 30 December 2014

E – Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

Increasing

Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment

F – Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

At least returned to pre-earthquake levels

New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced

G – People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders

Increasing

H – Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information agree taonga are better cared for and managed

Increasing

A collaborative cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility

I – Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

Increasing

J – Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural sector and government outcomes 

Increasing

Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations

Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

The Ministry continues to develop new topics for Te Ara and NZHistory as well as recording oral histories. Over the next three years the Ministry will progress two new oral history projects – “Remembering Christchurch Oral History Project” and “Treaty Settlement Histories Project”. The Ministry also encourages the community to contribute images, stories, and comments to our websites, including QuakeStories, 28th Māori Battalion, NZHistory, and Te Ara. 

Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

The Ministry produces a range of websites bringing New Zealand’s culture and heritage online. Over the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of visits to the Ministry’s websites. Total visits have increased from 3.7 million in 2008/09 to 5.7 million in 2011/12, representing a 53% increase. Total visits are estimated to be 7.0 million in 2012/13, which will represent an 89% increase over the past 5 years.

* 2013 figures are estimates only.

There were an estimated 15,000 visits to the National War Memorial in Wellington in 2011/12.

People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel informed about their country, history and culture

A survey of the Ministry’s website users was conducted during February and March 2013 to gain feedback about our websites and identify areas of development to be included in our programme of work. As part of this survey, we asked users how well informed they were about a variety of subjects. We also asked them how well informed they felt about New Zealand, its history, and its culture after using our websites, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, better informed, and extremely well informed. 75% of respondents felt they were at least better informed about New Zealand, its history and its culture after accessing our websites.

New Zealanders are switching to digital television

As the end of analogue television approaches, it is important all New Zealanders have the information and assistance they need to access digital television.

One of the Ministry’s flagship programmes is Going Digital, responsible for transitioning New Zealand to digital television by the end of 2013.

The number of households that have converted to digital television has increased from 70% in July 2010 to 91% in January 2013.

Hawke’s Bay and the West Coast were the first regions to go digital on 30 September 2012, followed by the rest of the South Island on 28 April 2013. The last two regions to go digital are the lower North Island and East Coast on 29 September 2013, followed by the upper North Island on 1 December 2013.

 

Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

A nationwide online survey of New Zealanders’ attitudes and beliefs about the First World War was conducted in November/December 2012. A total of 4,017 responses were received, from New Zealanders aged 15 years and over. The sample was representative of the New Zealand population age 15+ on region, age, gender, and ethnicity. The survey measured respondents’ understanding of the First World War, and their attitudes and preferences for commemorating the centenary of the First World War. The survey results indicated that, on a self-report basis:

· 48.9% of respondents had a basic understanding of the First World War.

· 24.9% of respondents had a reasonable understanding of the First World War.

· 15.7% of respondents had no real knowledge of the First World War.

· 6.9% of respondents had a reasonably advanced understanding of the First World War.

· 1.2% of respondents had an expert knowledge of the First World War, including its causes, the reason for New Zealand’s involvement and the campaigns and major battles fought by New Zealanders.

· 0.4% of respondents had never heard of the First World War.

This survey establishes a baseline understanding from which to measure the impact of the First World War Centenary Programme. A follow-up survey will be conducted at the completion of the centenary period (2018). The programme aims to increase the percentage of respondents indicating they have a reasonable, and reasonably advanced level of understanding about the First World War at the end of the centenary period. A similar approach has been taken in both Australia and the United Kingdom.

Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment

Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

Every three years, Creative New Zealand conducts its New Zealanders and the arts survey, which looks at attitudes, attendance and participation. The latest surveys were completed in 2011 and 2008. The 2008 data for Canterbury has been used as our baseline for attendance and participation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

In 2008, 81% of Christchurch residents attended an arts event in the last 12 months, and 44% participated in the arts over the last 12 months.

In 2007/08 Sport New Zealand conducted its Active New Zealand survey, which collects data on sport and recreation participation by New Zealand adults aged 16 and over. The results for the Canterbury West Coast region have been used as our baseline for participation in sport and recreation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

In 2007/08, 79.6% of adults took part in at least one sport or recreation activity per week. Over a 12 month period, 85.2% of adults participated in at least two different types of sport and recreation activities, and, on average, adults participated in 4.6 different sport and recreation activities.

New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced

People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the Treaty settlement process for the management and protection of Maori culture and heritage

During 2013 the Ministry was in the process of establishing the Treaty Settlement Histories project. Over the next three years the Ministry will be producing oral histories on the Treaty Settlement process, as well as other Treaty Settlement print and digital projects.

In March 2013, the Ministry asked users of the Ministry’s websites how well informed they were about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, well informed, extremely well informed. 48.5% of respondents consider that they are well informed or extremely well informed about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process.

Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed

The Ministry is responsible for managing taonga under the Protected Objects Act 1975, which regulates:

· the export of protected New Zealand objects;

· the illegal export and import of protected New Zealand and foreign objects; and

· the sale, trade and ownership of taonga tūturu, including what to do if you find a taonga or Māori artefact.

Our work in this area ensures significant movable heritage subject to the Protected Objects Act is not lost overseas.

In March 2013, the Ministry conducted a survey asking respondents to rate our work in this area using a scale of very poorly, poorly, well, very well. 72% of Māori respondents and 68% of New Zealanders rated this as well or very well.

A collaborative cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility

Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

In order to thrive, cultural organisations need sufficient resources. As well as self-generated income such as ticket sales, many organisations rely heavily on government support. Both central and local government invests in a wide range of cultural organisations; however more could be achieved if the funding base was increased.

In March-April 2009 the Ministry surveyed cultural organisations on the income they had obtained from gifts, grants and other charitable and sponsorship sources in the tax year of 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008. The Ministry worked closely with Creative New Zealand and the Charities Commission to identify around 2,000 cultural organisations to invite to take part in the survey.

Private or philanthropic giving is contributions received from trusts/foundations, corporate organisations, and individuals. In the 2007/08 tax year the level of private or philanthropic giving was $49.2 million, which represented 13% of total contributions received.

A subsequent survey was completed in 2012, with results being analysed in 2013.

Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

The Government continues its commitment to enhancing the performance of the public sector. In light of this and the constrained fiscal environment, the Ministry has worked with cultural sector organisations to improve coordination across the sector.

As at February 2012 there were 56 collaborative arrangements in place between agencies. These included shared systems, functions and individuals working across agencies in areas such as finance and communications. The number of collaborative arrangements increased to 91 in January 2013. While this number is increasing, over time this number is expected to decrease as greater efficiencies are established and multiple arrangements are consolidated into one arrangement. Although the number of arrangements will decrease, coordination and efficiencies across the funded agencies will increase as a result of greater collaboration.


Updated on 23rd July 2015