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Measuring progress against the Ministry impact indicators

 

Ministry impacts

Measures

Targets

Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations

A – Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

Increasing

B – Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

Increasing

People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

C – New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel informed about their country, history and culture

Increasing

D – Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

Increasing

Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment

E – Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

At least returned to pre-earthquake levels

New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced

F – People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders

Increasing

G – Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information agree taonga are better cared for and managed

Increasing

A collaborative cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility

H – Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

Increasing

I – Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural sector and government outcomes 

Increasing

Our histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood are preserved for past, present and future generations

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we will be doing

Ministry outputs

· Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

· Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

· Collecting and preserving oral and digital stories of cultural importance to New Zealand in a form accessible to current and future generations.

· Administering the New Zealand Oral History Awards annually.

· Managing the maintenance of war graves in New Zealand and abroad, and the National War Memorial.

· Maintaining Te Ara – the encyclopedia of New Zealand

· Developing policy to incentivise structural upgrading of heritage buildings as part of the review of the earthquake-prone building provisions of the Building Act 2004 (led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment).

· Administering legislation to protect symbols of nationhood and movable and found heritage.

· Reviewing the Protected Objects Act 1975.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage

· Maintain war graves and access to memorials and other places of national significance

· Delivery of the First World War centenary operating legacy projects

Histories and taonga are preserved for the future

The Ministry continues to increase the number of histories it records. Over the next four years the Ministry will produce significant new work in both print and digital format on New Zealand’s First World War history and heritage, as well as maintaining and developing the Te Ara and NZHistory websites and recording oral histories.

The Ministry will produce a book based on oral history interviews recorded for the “Remembering Christchurch Oral History Project” and progress two other oral history projects – the “Treaty Settlement Histories Project” and a commissioned “Department of Corrections Oral History Project”. The Ministry will also continue to encourage the community to contribute images, stories, and comments to our websites, including QuakeStories, 28th Māori Battalion, NZHistory, and Te Ara.

* 2014 figures are estimates only

 

Histories, taonga, places and symbols of nationhood managed by the Ministry are increasingly accessed

Websites

The Ministry produces a range of websites bringing New Zealand’s culture and heritage online. Over the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of visits to the Ministry’s websites. Total visits have increased from 3.7 million in 2008/09 to 7.8 million in 2012/13, representing a 111% increase. Total visits are estimated to be 9.2 million in 2013/14.

* 2014 figures are estimates only

The number of people using our information has continued to grow steadily over the past five years. Our websites have proven to be an effective channel of communication to increase people’s understanding of New Zealand’s heritage and culture. In our 2013 web satisfaction survey, we asked our website users what they thought was the best way of delivering content like ours, with options of Ebook, mobile app, printed book and website. 83.5% of respondents thought website was the best way.

National War Memorial

New Zealand’s National War Memorial is located at Buckle Street in Wellington. The Memorial commemorates all New Zealanders who gave their lives in the South African War, the two World Wars, the conflicts in Malaysia and Vietnam, and on peace-keeping operations world-wide. The National War Memorial features a Carillon, a Hall of Memories, and the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior. A National War Memorial Park to be based alongside the Memorial is currently under development.

The primary goal of the Memorial is to help visitors to remember and understand the New Zealand experience of war and its enduring impact on New Zealand society. There were 9,443 visits to the National War Memorial in Wellington in 2012/13. The Memorial is currently closed pending seismic strengthening so visitor numbers have decreased from previous years. The Memorial will re-open in December 2014.

National War Memorial Park

The National War Memorial Park (the Park) is currently under construction and is due to be completed in April 2015.  Construction of the Park is being managed by the New Zealand Transport Agency on behalf of the Ministry.

The Park sits within the wider context of the National War Memorial Precinct.  The vision for the Precinct is that it will be the national place for New Zealanders to remember and reflect on this country’s experience of war, military conflict and peacekeeping, and how that experience shapes our ideals and sense of national identity.  Visitors to the Park will be engaged through both on-site and on-line material.

We expect visitor numbers to the Precinct will peak in the weeks following the opening of the Park, the dedication of the Australian Memorial and Anzac Day before settling down to a more normal pattern.  The National War Memorial will also experience an increase in visitors as people visit the wider Precinct.

Book sales

The Ministry has helped to foster an increasing public appetite for printed information about New Zealand’s culture and heritage. A number of its print publications have been extremely popular: Frontier of Dreams (2005) has sold more than 26,000 copies; Nga Tama Toa (2008) 10,000 copies; and Māori Peoples of New Zealand (2006) and Trainland (2007) around 7,000 copies each. New Zealand and the First World War (2013) has sold out its first print run of 5000 copies and another 2500 have been printed. The Ministry’s total sales of all print publications is more than 100,000 sales across 34 different products since 2004/05.

Public talks

The Ministry arranged nine public talks during 2013/14 on subjects ranging through social history, war history and international relations. Each was attended by 50 to 60 people (2012/13: 50-60 people). The Ministry plans to hold the same number of talks in 2014/15.

People understand and enjoy New Zealand’s diverse culture and heritage

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we will be doing

Ministry outputs

· New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel informed about their country, history and culture

· Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

 

· Providing historical and cultural information that engages New Zealanders and international audiences, using a range of media, including print and digital.

· Producing and promoting significant cultural and historical resources and events, including First World War centenary commemorative digital and print projects.

· Progressing New Zealand’s First World War centenary commemorations projects, including National War Memorial Park.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of cultural sector services and activities, including visual, performing and literary arts, historic heritage, museum collections, taonga and whare taonga, cultural tourism, broadcasting and broadcasting standards.

· Scoping options for increasing the public accessibility of New Zealand’s audiovisual archives.

· Leading development of a National Identity Framework aimed at supporting cross-government initiatives for an inclusive society.

 

· Promotion of cultural events and significant commemorations

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Produce and promote cultural and historical resources

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Delivery of the First World War centenary operating legacy projects

 

New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel informed about their country, history and culture

In 2013, a survey of the Ministry’s website users was conducted to gain feedback about our websites and identify areas of development to be included in our programme of work. As part of this survey, we asked users how well informed they were about a variety of subjects. We also asked them how well informed they felt about New Zealand, its history, and its culture after using our websites, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, better informed, and extremely well informed. After viewing our websites, 97% of respondents felt at least ‘somewhat’ informed about New Zealand, its history and its culture, with 87% of respondents feeling either ‘better’ or ‘extremely’ well informed.

Knowledge and understanding of the First World War and the impact it had on New Zealand and New Zealanders increases

A nationwide online survey of New Zealanders’ attitudes and beliefs about the First World War was conducted in November/December 2012. A total of 4,017 responses were received, from New Zealanders aged 15 years and over. The sample was representative of the New Zealand population age 15+ on region, age, gender, and ethnicity. The survey measured respondents’ understanding of the First World War, and their attitudes and preferences for commemorating the centenary of the First World War. The survey results indicated that, on a self-report basis:

· 48.9% of respondents had a basic understanding of the First World War.

· 24.9% of respondents had a reasonable understanding of the First World War.

· 15.7% of respondents had no real knowledge of the First World War.

· 6.9% of respondents had a reasonably advanced understanding of the First World War.

· 1.2% of respondents had an expert knowledge of the First World War, including its causes, the reason for New Zealand’s involvement and the campaigns and major battles fought by New Zealanders.

· 0.4% of respondents had never heard of the First World War.

This survey establishes a baseline understanding from which to measure the impact of the First World War Centenary Programme. A follow-up survey will be conducted at the completion of the centenary period (2018). The Programme aims to increase the percentage of respondents indicating they have a reasonable, or reasonably advanced level of understanding about the First World War at the end of the centenary period. A similar approach has been taken in both Australia and the United Kingdom.

Our culture inspires positive changes in communities, the economy, and the environment

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we will be doing

Ministry outputs

· Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

· Providing advice on policy, funding and other opportunities to enhance the contribution of the cultural sector to the Government’s wider social and economic goals.

· Supporting the recovery from the Canterbury earthquakes by contributing to a range of cultural initiatives in greater Christchurch.

· Progressing the two recovery programmes – Arts & Culture Recovery Programme and the Heritage Buildings & Places Recovery Programme

· Supporting the cultural sector Joint-Agency Group (JAG) to ensure there is regular information-sharing on arts and cultural sector issues.

· Managing the Cultural Diplomacy International Programme to achieve desired outcomes.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Delivery of international cultural diplomacy projects


Participation in sport, arts, recreation and culture at all levels occurs across all of greater Christchurch

Every three years, Creative New Zealand conducts its New Zealanders and the Arts survey, which looks at attitudes, attendance and participation. The latest surveys were completed in 2011 and 2008. In 2011, 68% of Christchurch residents attended an arts event in the last 12 months (2008: 81%), and 38% participated in the arts over the last 12 months (2008: 44%). The 2008 data for Canterbury has been used as our baseline for attendance and participation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

The following participation figures have been drawn from Creative New Zealand’s Tōtara and Kahikatea investment programmes. The results indicate that overall greater Christchurch arts participation numbers are returning to pre-earthquake levels, despite there being fewer events for people to attend.

 

Greater Christchurch

Participation

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

 

Creative New Zealand

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts on Tour NZ

1,584

3,026

1,591

1,560

2,027

 

Chamber Music

New Zealand

0

3,248

2,645

3,723

4,733

 

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra

22,754

18,016

8,540

19,974

14,222

 

Footnote Dance

0

282

0

450

0

 

National Theatre for Children

2,633

2,174

730

397

1,576

 

New Zealand String Quartet

781

1,112

314

362

447

 

NZ Youth Choir /

Voices NZ Chamber Choir

0

3,250

2,380

1,300

0

 

The Court Theatre

100,323

81,048

33,860

98,808

97,726

 

The Physics Room

6,137

1,296

0

2,114

10,507

 

New Zealand Opera

879

0

0

0

4,003

 

Auckland Theatre Company

0

0

0

0

1,455

 

Black Grace

0

0

0

0

870

 

Kahurangi Māori

Dance Trust*

0

0

0

0

5,498

 

Christchurch Festival

of the Arts**

-

-

-

-

153,695

 

Total

135,091

113,452

50,060

128,688

296,759

 

*Kahurangi activity was ‘Theatre in Education’ school performances
**Christchurch Festival 2013 figure includes an estimated attendance of 42,000 at an exhibition in Cathedral Square. This is the first time they have reported attendance figures although they have been funded by Creative New Zealand in the past.

In 2007/08 Sport New Zealand conducted its Active New Zealand survey, which collects data on sport and recreation participation by New Zealand adults aged 16 years and over. The results for the Canterbury West Coast region have been used as our baseline for participation in sport and recreation prior to the Canterbury earthquakes.

In 2007/08, 79.6% of adults took part in at least one sport or recreation activity per week. Over a 12 month period, 85.2% of adults participated in at least two different types of sport and recreation activities, and, on average, adults participated in 4.6 different sport and recreation activities.

In 2013/14 Sport New Zealand conducted its Active New Zealand survey. The survey results will follow later in 2014.

Sport New Zealand conducted its Young People’s Survey in 2011 asking young people about their participation in sport and active recreation. Some Christchurch schools selected for the 2011 survey were not able to take part because of the earthquakes. These schools were given the opportunity to participate in 2012. The combined 2011/12 national results for around 18,000 students in primary, intermediate and secondary schools are now available.

For Greater Christchurch, results show that:

· over 6 out of 10 (63.9%)young people in the region spent 3+ hours a week on informalsport and recreation

over 5 out of 10 (54.6%) young people in the region spent 3+ hours a week on organised sport and recreation.

New Zealand’s unique Māori culture and heritage is protected and enhanced

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we will be doing

Ministry outputs

· People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders

· Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed

· Producing digital and print publications which showcase Māori culture, history, and language.

· Scoping the Treaty Settlement Histories oral, print, and digital projects, to be developed over the next two to three years.

· Co-ordinating wānanga, to assure the quality of content across the Ministry’s cultural publications.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation and funding to enhance the development of Māori culture and heritage.

· Providing guidance to Māorion cultural planning to support achievement of Māoricultural aspirations post-settlement.

· Encouraging the use of and access to te reo in the work and workplaces of agencies funded through the Ministry.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Collect and preserve oral history and digital stories

· Produce and promote cultural and historical resources and events

· Administration of legislation to protect taonga Māori and New Zealand cultural heritage

People who access Ministry information about the Treaty settlement process are better informed about the benefits of the Treaty settlement process for all New Zealanders

The Ministry is in the process of establishing the Treaty Settlement Histories project. Over the next three years, the Ministry will be producing oral histories on the Treaty settlement process, as well as other Treaty settlement print and digital projects.

In 2013, the Ministry asked users of the Ministry’s websites how well informed they were about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process, on a scale of not informed, somewhat informed, well informed, extremely well informed. Responses indicated 48.5% of respondents consider that they are well informed or extremely well informed about the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process.

Māori and New Zealanders who access Ministry information feel taonga are better cared for and managed

The Ministry is responsible for managing taonga under the Protected Objects Act 1975, which regulates:

· the export of protected New Zealand objects

· the illegal export and import of protected New Zealand and foreign objects

· the sale, trade and ownership of taonga tūturu, including what to do if you find a taonga or Māori artefact.

Our work in this area ensures significant movable heritage subject to the Protected Objects Act is not lost overseas.

In 2013, the Ministry conducted a survey asking respondents to rate our work in this area using a scale of very poorly, poorly, well, very well. 72% of Māori respondents and 68% of New Zealanders rated this as well or very well.

A collaborative cultural sector strengthens performance and flexibility

Impact measures

Initiatives – what we will be doing

Ministry outputs

· Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

· Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and the funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

· Developing a strategy to frame and drive the Government’s investments in New Zealand’s culture.

· Providing advice on policy, legislation, and funding to enhance sector coherence and infrastructure.

· Supporting the Heritage Forum to identify and manage priority work across the heritage sector.

· Improving funded agencies’ strategic planning and performance reporting frameworks through collaboration and support.

· Advising on mechanisms for sustaining the performance and financial strength of key cultural sector agencies, through agency cooperation and development of shared service arrangements, and assisting the cultural sector to diversify revenues.

· Undertaking reviews and making improvements in cultural areas, including the Protected Objects Act 1975 review, commemorations review and use of creative commons.

· Working with key agencies to increase levels of private and philanthropic giving in the wider cultural sector.

· Advising on the appointment of Board members for Crown-connected agencies.

· Advising on and administering legislation for the cultural Crown entities.

· Provide advice to support decision making by Ministers on government policy matters relating to arts, heritage and media

· Performance monitoring and development of arts, heritage, media and sport Vote-funded agencies

· Advice on and processing of arts, heritage, media and sport board appointments

· Negotiated services to support Ministers including speeches and correspondence

Level of private or philanthropic giving to arts and heritage organisations

To thrive, cultural organisations need sufficient resources. As well as self-generated income such as ticket sales, many organisations rely heavily on government support. Both central and local government invest in a wide range of cultural organisations. However, more could be achieved if the funding base was increased.

The Ministry is continuing to lead a cross-agency cultural philanthropy work programme to implement recommendations made by the Cultural Philanthropy Taskforce. These initiatives are well underway. Together they are laying the groundwork for growing the culture of giving, and asking, in New Zealand. Fully tapping into the significant potential for private giving to boost cultural activity will require an ongoing, sustained approach (such as continuing to promote knowledge of tax mechanisms and to recognise and value the generosity of philanthropists).

In late 2012, the Ministry surveyed cultural organisations on the level of support received from main sources over the past financial year. A total of 236 arts and heritage organisations who completed the 2012 survey also responded to the Ministry’s 2008 survey (covering the 2007/2008 financial year). 

The below figure shows the main funding sources received by these organisations in 2012.

2011/12 support from private/philanthropic giving and government as a proportion of the total income of arts and heritage organisations (longitudinal respondents)

Private or philanthropic giving includes contributions received from trusts/foundations; corporate organisations; and individuals, couples or families. In 2011/2012, support received from private and philanthropic sources accounted for 13% of the total level of income of arts and heritage organisations. This included 5% from trusts, foundations and other philanthropic organisations, 5% from corporate organisations, and 3% from individuals, couples or families.

The 41% of income of the arts and heritage organisations from “other sources” included earnings from box office sales, hire or fee revenue, bar sales, programme or merchandise sales, asset sales, and interest received on investments.

As the table on the next page shows, the level of private and philanthropic support for arts organisations declined between 2008 and 2012. The decline occurred in the context of an overall decline in economic growth during this period.

Among heritage organisations, the level of support received from trusts and foundations, and individuals, couples or families increased between 2008 and 2012. However, the level of support received from corporates declined between 2008 and 2012.  The difference in the level of corporate giving to heritage organisations between 2008 and 2012 was due to larger donations by two organisations in 2008 ($6.7 million, compared to $2.6 million in 2012). If the impact of these donations are removed, the level of corporate giving was largely unchanged between 2008 and 2012. The increase in the level of government support for heritage organisations was largely due to an increase in the level of central government support to the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa between 2008 and 2012.

2008 & 2012 support from private/philanthropic giving and government for arts and heritage organisations (longitudinal respondents)

 

 


2007 / 2008

$m


2011 / 2012*

$m

Difference

Arts

All private/philanthropic

24.3

21.4

-2.8

Trusts/foundations

9.7

8.3

-1.4

Corporates

10.4

9

-1.4

Individuals, couples or families

4.1

4

-0.1

Government and local government bodies

35.1

34.6

-0.5

Heritage

All private/philanthropic

11.8

8.8

-3.1

Trusts/foundations

2.5

3.3

0.8

Corporates

7.2

2.9

-4.3

Individuals, couples or families

2.1

2.5

0.4

Government and local government bodies

58.2

71.7

13.5

* 2011/12 figures have been adjusted for inflation to enable a comparison of the level of spending between 2008 & 2012.
Please note that these results relate to a relatively small number of organisations and may not represent all arts and heritage organisations.

Collaboration between funded agencies, and between the Ministry and funded agencies, to achieve cultural and government outcomes

The Government continues its commitment to enhancing the performance of the public sector. In light of this and the constrained fiscal environment, the Ministry has worked with cultural sector organisations to improve coordination across the sector.

As at December 2012 there were 56 collaborative arrangements in place between agencies. These included shared systems, functions and individuals working across agencies in areas such as finance and communications. The number of collaborative arrangements increased to 91 in January 2013 and 121 in December 2013. While this number is increasing, over time this number is expected to decrease as greater efficiencies are established and multiple arrangements are consolidated into one arrangement. Although the number of arrangements will decrease, coordination and efficiencies across the funded agencies will increase as a result of greater collaboration.

Heritage Forum

The Government has indicated a need for closer integration between public agencies and a more coherent approach to policy development. In 2011/12, the Ministry established the Heritage Forum to forge stronger links and more coherence across the sector, and to be a visible presence promoting heritage interests at a national level.

In 2013/14 the Ministry increased its support for the Forum. This enabled the Forum to refresh its focus and begin developing a new strategic work programme for 2014/15 and future years. Information on the Forum and its work can be found at http://www.mch.govt.nz/what-we-do/our-projects/current/heritage-forum.


Updated on 23rd July 2015